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My Word

  • MY WORD: Habitat needs a variety of helpers

    Everybody wants to “pound nails,” but the Shelby County Habitat for Humanity also needs volunteers to serve on our committees. Strong committees ensure our affiliate can sustain long-term house building in Shelby County. Everyone has a talent, and your talents would be welcome to serve in some capacity on one of our committees.

  • MY WORD: There are attrocities right here in the U.S.

    If a picture is worth a thousand words, video evidence must warrant a book. It's a book the Obama administration recommended to members of Congress and the American people last week as the president and those in his circle made the plea for military strikes against the Syrian government in the wake of gas attacks they allegedly carried out on citizens of that country.

  • MY WORD: Parks board tried to save gym

    For the record, the Shelbyville-Shelby County Parks Board did all they could to make the women's gym a reality and keep it up and going. It bothers me that people do not ever give at least a little credit when credit is due.

    For those that do not know the whole story of Curves and the FAC Women's Gym, this is what really took place. I as parks director, in 2012, was approached by an individual and told that the owner of Curves was planning to close it in December. The individual asked if we would take it over and move the equipment to the FAC.

  • MY WORD: How to disprove your own argument
  • MY WORD: Requiem for a tree

    When I was a little boy, my favorite book was The Giving Tree, by Shel Silverstein. Perhaps like most children, I was always saddened by the slow disappearance of the tree into the insatiable worldly desires of the young boy. The apples and branches and trunk all find their way into the black hole of the boy’s ambition.

    “I want money, a house, a boat.” Take from my body, the tree says. I am told that the story is a parable for the selfless giving of a parent, a friend, a Christ, a God who is willing to sacrifice in the name of love and affection.

  • MY WORD: Parking reality for judicial center employees

    Despite The Sentinel News’ reporting that the Shelby County Judicial Center employees have fallen out of grace with the Centenary United Methodist Church next door (Church: No more park,” June 28), we believed the relationship was a good one. We were very grateful and appreciative of the church’s generosity in offering convenient and safe reserved parking spots for full-time state employees. No such thought was given by the powers that be who supervised the planning of the new judicial center.  

  • MY WORD: A proposal to atheists

    I wish to throw my support firmly behind Chuck Souder’s article (“The Founders’ Declaration of ‘In-Dependence,’” June 28),pertaining to the American Founders’ “dependence upon God” and the idea they taught Americans should be “grateful and accountable to God.” Sometimes, atheists like to selectively quote the Founders, as if the Founders were atheists, which they were not. Souder has the strength of history on his side.

    Washington: Farewell Address to the American People,1796:

  • MY WORD: Don’t throw out trash talk

    As one who attended the Shelbyville City Council’s public hearing on curbside trash and recycling, it was disheartening to see the turnout and hear the spin put on the subject. In my opinion the spin was at best misleading and worst self-serving (“Curbside trash, recycling talk draws small crowd,” July 31).

  • MY WORD: The legacy of our children

    Ten years after I graduated from college, I felt like I had a dual life. On one hand, I was a husband and new father. On the other hand, I was a salesman with a $14 million, 5-state territory.

    The two parts of my life battled each other. I performed the job from my car and was the classic "road warrior." It was not uncommon for me to leave on a Monday morning and spend the majority of the week calling the other portion of my life from a hotel telephone.

  • MY WORD: How I made it to 102

    Hard work won't kill you, for I did my share of that. Born on July 24, 1911. as the only girl in the family of Thomas D. and Minnie K Lewis, I had three older brothers to put up with. This meant I had to clean up after them, help cook their meals and wash their dishes.