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My Word

  • MY WORD: New assistant principal followed his heart to Shelby County

    Law school’s loss is East Middle School’s gain. Because Myron Montgomery decided to become a teacher and not a corporate attorney, the Missiles now have a new assistant principal who said, “I knew this was something I wanted to do for a long time....This is an industry where everyone is invested in improvement of the product, and our product is a kid that we want to be successful.”

  • My WORD: Saddlebred group clarifies position about rift with some members

    The Board of Directors of the American Saddlebred Horse Association would like to respond to the article (“Saddlebred group has a bumpy ride,” July 27), which pertains to current litigation pending between the ASHA and a small group who refer to themselves as “concerned members” of the ASHA. We are a volunteer group of passionate and dedicated horsemen and women elected by our members to provide leadership and governance.

  • NEIHOF: The whole story about the Collins turf problem

    Despite comments published in recent weeks in The Sentinel-News, Shelby County Public Schools wants the public to know it does not enter into construction contracts without close scrutiny of reputations and references. It does not accept work that is not up to expectations. It does not absorb the financial burden if a problem comes up. It does not put students and staff in an unsafe environment. 

  • MY WORD: The shooting of Gen. Denhardt is one of Shelby's biggest stories

    Henry H. Denhardt, a former adjutant general and a lieutenant governor of Kentucky, was charged in 1936 for the murder of his girlfriend, Verna Garr Taylor of Henry County.

    A trial took place in Henry County on April 20, 1937. More than 1,000 people gathered for the trial, with entertainment and refreshments being offered on the courthouse lawn.

    It ended in a hung jury, and a retrial was scheduled on Sept. 21, 1937.

  • MY WORD: This wallflower blooms rather than withers

    Beth Newton has vivid memories of her school days...memories that are nightmares starting with the eighth grade. “I didn’t do any work. I didn’t care....My family didn’t care, so why should I care?”

    Moving to Louisville intensified the situation. “I didn’t know any of the subjects and felt stupid,” she said. “So I would check in first block and then leave. They never noticed I wasn’t there the rest of the day.”

  • NEIHOF: Success stories in teaching students to read

    Why spend $160,000 on summer school? Is it worth that much money? Yes.

    However, if you don’t believe me, ask Kara or Dakota.

    These elementary children attended the 4-week session last summer and have reaped the benefit this school year as a second-grader and fourth-grader, respectively.

    What benefit? The ability to read.

  • MY WORD: Monumental fun can make a big difference

    In communities across the nation, cemeteries are dying.
    That’s what happens when the living fail to honor, preserve and restore their local cemeteries. It’s also the result when cemetery boards fail to keep the cemetery alive and vital by investing in surrounding property for the future and providing opportunities for the living to honor and preserve the resting place of the dead.
    Grove Hill Cemetery in the center of Shelby County is alive and well.

  • MY WORD: Freedom Hall really was about freedom on Saturday

    I was in Freedom Hall the night Anderson County played for the state basketball championship. It was the place where I heard Muhammad Ali say he wanted to fight George Foreman and Joe Frazier on the same night.

    I saw Julius Erving, then of the Virginia Squires, do things with a basketball that I had never seen and still can't describe. I have been to several concerts there, and I watched Richie Farmer make string music at the state finals 23 years ago.

  • MY WORD: High achiever ready to soar higher

    Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science at Western Kentucky University will enroll its third student from Shelby County Public Schools when the 2011-2012 school year begins next fall.

    Sam Saarinen, a sophomore at Shelby County High School, has been selected for the incoming junior class and for the 2013 graduating class. Sam, the son of Tim and Anne Saarinen is following in the footsteps of Chris Obermeyer, who is now at Duke University, and Katherine Goebel, who graduates this spring.

  • MY WORD: SCHS seniors: Alphabetical is our order

    This letter, signed by the 2011 senior class at Shelby County High School, was submitted for publication by Lane Taylor.

     

    Rockets say “thanks but no thanks” to the arrogance parade at graduation.