.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

My Word

  • MY WORD: Collins High School seniors to administrators: Continue graduation seating policy

    his open letter of April 18 from the 2011 senior class of Collins High School to the administration at Collins High School was provided to The Sentinel-Newsby Elizabeth Sames:
     
    On behalf of the 2011 Senior Class of Martha Layne Collins High School, we would like to formally object not only to the decision to eliminate class ranking from the seating of graduation, but also the fact that our classmates including valedictorian, salutatorian, and class officers will not be able to speak to their peers as we come together this final day.

  • MY WORD: Could we agree on posting these Four Commandments?

    During the past several decades, we have had a number of court rulings:

    §       School-sponsored prayer or Bible reading.

    §       Removal of creches from public property.

    §       Ending the Pledge of Allegiance as mandatory.

    §       Removal of the Ten Commandments from public property.

  • MY WORD: 10 reasons why the commandments should come down

    I wholeheartedly support Linda Allewalt in her efforts concerning removal of the Ten Commandments from the walls of Shelbyville’s government buildings (“Ten Commandments must come down,” April 20).

    I don't understand the reluctance in taking it down – unless it's a daily reminder to the religious government employees who might forget? Let's go through the list itself as it

    might apply to a government building:

  • MY WORD: It’s time for the Ten Commandments display to come down

    Nine years ago, as a newcomer to the state of Kentucky and a new resident of Shelbyville, I went to the Shelby County Courthouse to get a Kentucky driver’s license. On the wall of that office was a large standalone framed display of the Ten Commandments.

    To understand my reaction to seeing this, one must take the view of 1) a person who is non-religious and 2) a person who had at that time a budding awareness of issues of separation of church and state.

  • NEIHOF: Graduation still is about recognition

    Seniors at both high schools are in the final stretch before receiving their diplomas. Excitement is high this year, too, because of some changes that will honor more students – at home.

    Both commencement exercises will take place in the individual school gyms with overflow seating with a live broadcast in the school theaters. This arrangement is made possible because of the reduced number in the graduating class because of the two high schools.

    The celebrations can now occur at home, rather than at the Frankfort convention center.

  • MY WORD: Graduation should honor competitive students

    The recent letters to The Sentinel-Newsconcerning seating of honor students at Collins High School commencement reminds me of the same controversy two years ago at SCHS. At that time we were parents of an honor student whose seating was to be based on class rank.

    We had expected this, as this was the tradition at the high school when our older daughter graduated in 2005.  The message this sent was simple: There is competition in the academic world, it is important, and excellence will be recognized.

  • MY WORD: At-risk students hear motivational message for students

    “You need people around you with drug problems.”

    When Roger Cleveland made that statement to a group of African-American students and school administrators, you could hear an intake of breath. Cleveland, an Eastern Kentucky University assistant professor, then added, “People who drug you to church...who drug you to the ACT prep sessions...who drug you to ballgames...who drug you away from the knuckleheads who might take you down the wrong path.”

  • MY WORD: Shouldn't Shelby County schools honor top grads?

    Living in a state where three out of 10 of our high school students fail to graduate, it makes sense to celebrate and honor every child that can don a mortarboard and accept a diploma. We are proud of all that made the commitment to graduate: students, teachers, parents.
     Yet, in a world that is shrinking so quickly that Kentucky children compete with children in China to grow-up to have a good-paying job and a home of their own, is it enough to celebrate graduation without recognizing those who did more to earn their diplomas?

  • MY WORD: Cutting Medicaid is no place to start with state budget

    I am writing to express my disappointment in local politicians for supporting the proposed 35 percent, across-the-boards reduction in Kentucky Medicaid services. Do they fully understand the impact this would have on our most frail and vulnerable population?

  • MY WORD: Let's get our government's attention

    Could someone please explain to me what is going on in this country? America has got it backwards. It is not the people who offer only their opinion and sit behind a desk and make decisions that make this country great. It is the people who have produced everything you see and use that make this country great.