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My Word

  • MY WORD: Standing up for the cause of Souder

    In response to Linda Allewalt's letter (“Souder’s divisive tones,” Sept. 28), criticizing the writings of columnist Chuck Souder, like Ms. Allewalt, I generally don't respond after I've read a bunch of gibberish. I just toss the paper on the sofa, shake my head and go out and mow some grass. However, there was something about this particular letter that finally tipped the proverbial scales for me. It struck a chord in my soul so vividly that I knew I could no longer stand on the sidelines and be silent. For that, I thank Ms. Allewalt.

  • MY WORD: Fire prevention is a shared responsibility

    As many of you know, October is Fire Safety Month. It is a time that the fire service puts forth a little extra effort to get information out to the public to hopefully prevent a tragic loss of life or large loss of property.

    A fire can be a horrible event.  It is a phenomenon worthy of the fear and  respect it receives. October 8, 1871, is the date that spawned the need for  fire safety awareness.

  • MY WORD: Brown may not have been convicted

    In The Sentinel-News(“Shouldn’t we all be outraged,” Sept. 28) the Tonya Brown case called into question whether the commonwealth is doing an adequate job protecting its citizens in pursuing justice on behalf of victims of crimes. This letter is to inform the citizens of the 53rd Judicial District what happened in the Tonya Brown case and why certain decisions were made.

  • MY WORD: Brown may not have been convicted

    In The Sentinel-News “Shouldn’t we all be outraged,” Sept. 28) the Tonya Brown case called into question whether the commonwealth is doing an adequate job protecting its citizens in pursuing justice on behalf of victims of crimes. This letter is to inform the citizens of the 53rd Judicial District what happened in the Tonya Brown case and why certain decisions were made.

  • MY WORD: What’s wrong with our economy?

    The federal government has imposed so many rules and regulations upon businesses that to administer their affairs requires too much overhead cost for them to reap a profit in what they produce or sell.

  • MY WORD: Lots of people contributed to new historical project

    The Shelby County Historical Society officially opened its new World War II exhibit at its annual picnic on Sunday.

    President Sherry Jelsma thanked several members of the Society – Sharon Hackworth, Jim Cleveland, Nancy Hill and Col. Roger Green – for their contributions to the exhibit, which may be seen at two locations: the hometown front in the second floor of the Shelbyville Welcome Center and the military part in the VFW building next to the parking lot adjoining the center. 

  • MY WORD: A response from Midwest Metals on zoning debate

    As the applicant for the proposed rezoning of 478 Kentucky Street, we feel compelled to respond to the recent letters that have been printed regarding our project. Midwest Metals is a local, family-owned business, and we take great pride in being a good neighbor while providing a valuable service to the community.

  • MY WORD: Shame on you, Shelby County School Board

    Not even a “thank you” to the taxpayers of Shelby County.
    The citizens of Shelby County need to wake up and take notice of the total disregard our current school board has for the anxiety most taxpayers feel about our financial future. We should be outraged and disgusted by what took place at the Aug. 25 school board meeting.

  • MY WORD: Some points about the zoning decision that need to be heard

    It’s hard to say park and scrap metal recycling plant in the same sentence. It would be harder yet to live with a recycling plant in the same block as a park. Even if we can’t have a voice at the 10 a.m., Sept. 20, Shelby County Fiscal Court meeting, we can have a presence and that might help our magistrates keep the facts for their decision in focus.

  • MY WORD: Plan for more spending is not the solution

    As I traveled across Kentucky over the past several weeks, meeting with constituents and hearing their concerns, one overriding issue became clear: People are concerned that our stagnant economy is not turning around. With unemployment in the commonwealth at 9.5 percent and the recent news that not a single net new job was created in the country last month, they’re right to be worried.