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My Word

  • MY WORD: Kentucky has 'rotary dial laws in an iPhone world’

    In 2006, the Kentucky Legislature took a major step towards building Kentucky’s economy by overwhelmingly passing the Emerging Technology and Consumer Choice Act. Lawmakers recognized that outdated, monopoly-era regulations were hampering competition and stifling investment in advanced technologies, and took direct action to reduce them.

  • MY WORD: Here's a needed lesson in the art of tattooing

    Steve Doyle seems to be very poorly educated on the art of tattooing ("On Valentine's Day, no love loss for tattooing," Feb. 15). I am going to try my best to inform him without offending him, a quality he would be well advised to inherit (oops, there I go already).

  • MY WORD: Let’s review options before investing in statue of Boone

    I have been interested for some time in Joe Ruble’s proposal to erect a statue in east end Shelbyville to counterbalance the beautiful horse statue in front of the fairgrounds (“Help us to honor Squire Boone,” Feb. 22). While I have some reservations about the need for such a status, I think Mr. Ruble has picked the wrong man.

    The fact that he is distantly related to Squire would seem to me to be a conflict of interest. But that is beside the point; if we’re going to have a statue, Mr. Ruble is entitled to make the case for his candidate.

  • MY WORD: Students learn to live with type 1 diabetes

    As many as 3 million Americans may have type 1 diabetes, often referred to as juvenile diabetes. The rate of type 1 diabetes incidents among children under the age of 14 is estimated to increase by 3 percent annually worldwide.

    Those statistics hit home with Shelby County Public Schools students Bryan Stapleton and Jacob Lisby, who both have experienced two of the warning signs – extreme thirst and frequent urination.

    Jacob said he also remembers “sitting around and doing nothing; felt I couldn’t,”

  • MY WORD: Help us honor Squire Boone

    As I looked through my grandmother’s family Bible, I saw where our family was kin to many famous pioneers. And after reading further, I found out how much one of my cousins, Squire Boone, had done.

    Of the first white men who dared to enter “the dark and bloody ground” in the early 1770s, brothers Daniel and Squire were the only two to come back alive. They had lived in the Radkin Valley in North Carolina. Squire was born in Pennsylvania.

  • MY WORD: Some serious questions about charter schools?

    State Rep. Brad Montell (R-Shelbyville) has introduced two bills to the Kentucky legislature that put forth very specific agendas concerning our public schools. One bill, BR116, has the catchy title of “The Great Schools Tax Credit Bill” and the other is BR117, a bill creating charter schools.

  • MY WORD: Chamber undergoing many changes

    A healthy business environment is a foundation for economic growth. Business provides the services and products consumers demand; and business creates the jobs people need. Business success fuels the tax base that allows government to provide the services citizens want. Business activity supports development of the quality of life we all want in the Shelby County Community.
    Creating the kind of community where business can succeed and grow is hard work and takes considerable planning and implementation – and it is serious business for your Chamber of Commerce.

  • MY WORD: Painful lessons about being American learned abroad

    I departed Dec. 26 for London, England, for an advertising class that lasted two weeks, but would also count as college credit for a course at UK.  As I knew absolutely no one else going on this trip, to say I was nervous would be an understatement.
    I woke up every morning at 7 a.m., which would be 2 am here.  I had a complimentary breakfast provided by one of London’s finest hotels.  I would then attend a 30-minute class with around 30 other students from 12 different other universities in the U.S.

  • MY WORD: Why attack those health-care professionals who are trying to help?

    The price of a full-page ad in a local county paper costs an average exceeding $500. The Kentucky Medical Association has placed ads regarding “Identify Medical Doctors” in many local papers statewide. The total money spent by this organization on their recent smear campaign targeting non-medically degreed health-care providers probably totals thousands.

  • NEIHOF: State budget makes negative impact

    There is a new bandwagon to support public education. Seven organizations representing the full spectrum of elementary and secondary education in Kentucky have banded together to urge Gov. Steve Beshear and the General Assembly to reverse four years of state funding reductions to key services that support teaching and learning in the state’s public schools.

    Thank goodness. Public school officials cannot make the demand alone. Our voices for help need to be heard loud and clear, and the more people screaming the message, the more likely we will be heard.