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My Word

  • MY WORD: Shelby County needs a Fairness ordinance

    Dozens of Shelbyville residents crowded our city hall last November calling on Mayor Tom Hardesty and the city council to consider passage of a simple, anti-discrimination fairness ordinance. The proposed law would prohibit discrimination in employment, housing or public accommodations based upon a person's actual or perceived race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age (over 40), disability, familial status, sexual orientation or gender identity.

  • MY WORD: About those climate issues

    If Rudy Wiesemann was vying for the irony award with his My Word ("No need to save the planet,” May 1), he should win it hands down. Because after grandly stating that he could not let "unreferenced misstatements go unrefuted," and that he "prefer[s] to rely on facts to expose errors, myths, [and] mistakes," he then proceeds to lay out paragraph after paragraph of unreferenced misstatements, logical errors, easily debunked myths and outright mistakes.

  • MY WORD: Thank you to a legend of Shelby County

    Give me a “S.” Give me a “C.” Hip, Hip, Hooray, Shelby County!

    We’ve learned that Shelby County’s most exuberant, tireless and faithful cheerleader has announced her retirement. Shelby County’s strongest advocate, Duanne Puckett, is retiring this month from her role as Public Relations Coordinator for Shelby County Public Schools.  Leaving the role of the face and often the handshake of Shelby County’s education system marks the close of just one chapter in Duanne’s lifetime of service to this community.

  • MY WORD: Make fines stiffer for adults

    I was heartened to hear members of the Shelbyville City Council may make adult-provided or adult-present minors' use of illegal substances a city as well as a county and state penalty (“Adult hosts of teen parties may be fined,” May 20). This I hope you will pass.

    However, I encourage you to change the minimum fine to $1000 for the first offense, with multiples of that for later offenses. Here is why.

  • MY WORD: ‘Miss Bug’ spotlights a final student

    When I visited the Education Center @ Cropper on May 2, I chatted with a junior, Jose Menendez, about the online algebra course he was taking. He switched gears and reminded me that we first met when he was a student at Painted Stone Elementary. He vividly remembered the history lesson I shared about the Painted Stone settlement and even the rock painted red that I brought with me.

    “You’re ‘Miss Bug,’ right?” he asked.

    He was right.

  • MY WORD: Saying thanks to a pair of extraordinary music teachers who helped us grow

    NOTE: Chris Hauck, a former resident of Shelby County, was one of the participants in the memorial jam concert on Saturday to honor late former music teachers Ernie Threlkeld, Susie Saunders and Mel Owen. He wrote this on the Facebook after Threlkeld’s passing last fall. Hauck shared it for publication.

     

  • MY WORD: The real challenge to education

    In response to my article titled (“Is public education at a crossroad?” My Word, April 10), Rev. Jerry Stephenson suggested that I had “left out some important points as it relates to charter schools and the value they could bring to Kentucky” (“In support charter schools,” My Word, April 17).

  • MY WORD: A take on outlet mall construction

    Jamie Jarboe of Simpsonville created this drawing to show her feelings about the ecological issues around construction of the outlet mall at Simpsonville.

  • MY WORD: What Jason Collins did was not heroic

    NBA player Jason Collins made headlines and history last week when he became the first active male player from one of the big four team sports to openly announce he was gay. Of all the adjectives used to describe the announcement,  “courageous’ seems to be the most oft-repeated. I disagree for two reasons.

  • MY WORD: How to help feed the birds

    I suggest each of you save money, save your valuable time and save birds – even if not all of you would like to do. I hope to suggest to you as to how this can be accomplished in such a way that also hopefully will make you proud.