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My Word

  • MY WORD: Cautions against court-led legislation
  • MY WORD: Focusing on a commonsense approach

    Several months, an otherwise pleasant evening was suddenly ruined when I stepped onto wet carpet in the basement of our home. Heavy rains had put our sump pump to the test and it finally failed. The water rose and soon our entire basement was in danger of being soaked.

  • MY WORD: The power – or speed – of the press

    When I moved back to Shelby County several years ago, I was driving east from KY 55 onto Interstate 64 when an idea nearly hit me right in the side of my SUV or maybe right between my eyes.

    Because that notion arrived dangerously quickly with  the 75-mph motion of oncoming traffic into which I was trying to merge or arose frighteningly fast in front of me in the form of the guardrail at the end of the acceleration lane on that ramp. I can’t be sure which, because each seemed about to christen me with opportunity.

  • MY WORD: Purple Heart marks our freedom

    Francis Regis McKinley Jr. is listed among those soldiers who fought for our freedom during the Vietnam War and who earned a Purple Heart… well, two to be exact, except both are for the same artillery attack in which he was wounded.

    He was embarrassed to be singled out for his service since others in the county were in Vietnam and even wounded. Plus he said, “That’s all in the past. You have to live for the now.”

  • MY WORD: An unexpected history lesson

    Family history in Shelby County is a cottage industry. The heritage of so many goes back not only to the days of Squire Boone and his bedrock but seemingly to the founding waters of Clear Creek itself.

    Names such as Meriwether and Ballard begat Shannons and Matthews and Van Stockums. You read this history, and you connect dots. As my friend Brig. Gen. Ronald Van Stockum often has told me, the things we learn about our heritage in the Internet-driven world is amazing.

  • MY WORD: Remembering Shelbyville’s friend, patriot

    A real U. S. Patriot died on May 14, 2014. His name is C. (for Cornelius) L. Love.

    I’m not sure how old he was at the time of his passing, but he was well into his 90s.

    A Mississippi native, Mr. Love would have undoubtedly had a brilliant future were it not for the injuries, physical and mental, that he suffered during World War II. As it was, he was a very unique person, known far and wife for his friendliness, and his willingness to go “that extra mile” to a friend in need.

  • MY WORD: The Power of the Nap

    As a “second shift” parent – an older adult who is now parenting a second family – I am rediscovering the joys of parenthood, as well as the occasional frustrations. 

    Young children take a lot of time, patience, attention and energy. When you are dealing with two children under the age of three, these resources can seem to be in short supply.  This supply and demand problem is further complicated because the kids are seldom on the same page.  Most of the time their needs are in direct opposition.

  • MY WORD: Removing unnecessary bureaucratic input

    Every time Howard Pearce and I had an opportunity for a serious discussion, which was rare, I would often say something like “that isn’t fair.”  He would say, “Life was not meant to be fair.”

    He never got around to explaining why. That’s rather like saying to a child who asks one those inscrutable questions, “It just isn’t” or “Because I said so,” then end the discussion by hiding behind a newspaper.

  • MY WORD: A vacuum in leadership

    Nature abhors a vacuumaccording to Aristotle and Sir Isaac Newton. 

    They were talking about physics, saying that no object or no place can be truly empty.  They argued that every place and everything is filled with something.  The same rule applies to geopolitics and global leadership. 

  • MY WORD: Climate change – where is our world going?

    Recently the head of a United Nations panel warned, "If the world doesn't cut pollution of heat-trapping gases, global warming could become out of control." A group of Nobel laureate scientists predicts dangers are going to become worse as time passes.

    Cris Field of the Carnegie Institute for Science in California reports, "We live in an area where impacts from climate change are already widespread and consequential." Other climate scientists say, "Nobody around the world is immune."