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My Word

  • MY WORD: Working peacefully together to bring about change

    The following is the Shelbyville Area NAACP’s Statement on Furguson, MO.

    We the Shelbyville Area NAACP, would like to speak to our local community about the Furguson, Mo., incident. We want our local community to know that the local branch stands with the national NAACP on this issue.

  • MY WORD: Taoism and leaving the economy alone

    A chap by the name of Craig Lindsay wrote a letter to the editor of the Wall Street Journal, which appeared in the Nov. 8 edition. His thesis is that a successful economy run by a private enterprise economy in a political environment of freedom within the law truly does lift all boats.

    The problem is it also produces outstanding success stories to which the ever-present “left” can view with alarm exclaiming “Hey, wait a minute. You’re not getting your fair share, these dirty capitalists are getting rich off your sweat.”

  • MY WORD: Personal economics

    Tell this to your children early, and junior high is not too early.

    In the 18th century Samuel Johnson said, “Whatever you make, spend less.” In the 20th century Howard Pearce said, “You can go in debt for a home or a business, but for anything else if you can’t pay cash you don’t need it.”

    The first thing you must learn is to be able to distinguish between NEED and WANT. Above all if you can’t pay 100% of your credit and debt when due, cut the card up.

  • MY WORD: Fairness is unfair

    Regarding the letter “Looking for equal treatment with fairness” that ran in the October 22 edition of The Sentinel-News, most individuals who populate Shelby County are unaware that a problem exists among our youth where homelessness is an issue – which is what the author professes. That encompasses youths in both lifestyles – heterosexual or alternative lifestyles.

  • MY WORD: Grove Hill memorializes World War II casualties

    When I was growing up, one of my best friends was Meme Greenwell – her dad, Richard “Puss” Greenwell, was a teacher, football coach and later principal for Shelbyville High School. Her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. S.V. Greenwell, lived on Henry Clay Street – where until recent years the storm door still featured the “G” on the front.

    I remember “Puss” talking about his brother “Jake” who was killed in World War II.

  • MY WORD: Look beyond the initial benefits
  • MY WORD: Letting private business continue on course

    I’ve heard local and state officials say – off the record, of course – the only thing Kentucky has going for it is cheap energy.

    The Alpha Natural Resources Co. says they may close 11 coal mines in West Virginia and lay off 1,100 workers. They found out they can ship coal by sea from the country of Columbia up the east coast for about half the cost of shipping it by rail from Kentucky. What’s more, they say it is easier to get out the ground and burns more efficiently. As if we didn’t have enough to worry about.

  • MY WORD: Remembering the heart behind the Shelbyville Fountain
  • MY WORD: A simple act of kindness makes family’s day

    Tonight my family experienced the most beautiful form of humbleness in an act so simple yet so grand I cant stop smiling about it even now, hours later.

    I have come to a point in my life where I can no longer bear to watch the news anymore, so much destruction, so much hate, so many bad things happening, it just makes me sad and gives me a sense of defeat for our world. 

    So my husband and I decided we had to share our experience tonight [Sunday], to remind others, including ourselves, of the good that still remains.

  • MY WORD: Economic achievement makes nations great

    In 1923 Ataturk told the new country he forged from the Ottoman Empire, “No matter how great they are, political and military victories cannot endure unless they are crowned by economic triumphs.”

    Truer words were never spoken.

    If we survive the multitude of messes we’re in — the conflict between Russia and her former satellites, the surging power of the Islamic terrorists, our impossible national debt, and an oppressive and dictorial government — will we turn back to the economic system that built this country?