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Editorials

  • WHAT WE THINK: Veterans deserve more than a day

    There are not enough ways to say thank you to the veterans who have served our country and continue to serve. Veterans Day, to be celebrated on Monday, gives us a chance to create ceremony for this purpose, but we don’t think it ever could be enough.

    Set aside the long-term commitment to preserving our life, liberty and freedom. Set aside our veterans’ efforts to rid the world of danger and nuisance. Set aside the overall public safety of the United States.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: 2 unscary decisions about Halloween

    Dire weather forecasts and government intervention created a scary pattern of miscommunication this Halloween. You didn’t know when and if you should send out your children to trick or treat, and you looked to your elected leaders to make that parenting decision.

    Thus when public judgment stepped into personal arena there, was more bad information flying around than witches and ghosts in the blustery breezes. What we had here was a frightening inability for the right persons to make the right decisions.

  • WHAT WE THINK: The Cabinet is protecting itself, not Jackleen Lane

    The Cabinet for Health and Family Services has responded as we expected: going to court in Shelby County to prevent you from knowing what you have a right to know about how well it protected Jackleen Lane.

    The Cabinet does not want to conform to a judgment in September by the office of Attorney General Jack Conway that it violated state Open Records laws by denying to release to The Sentinel-News records concerning its oversight of Ms. Lane.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: Pleasureville's fairness move

    An amazing decision could be made on Monday night in the small, partially-in-Shelby County city of Pleasureville, where the city commission will take up second reading of a proposed Fairness Ordinance.

    You may recall that this is a measure suggested to address specific non-discrimination procedures for housing and employment, among others, based on race, religion, creed, color or sexual orientation.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Redistricting needs open ears and minds

    When it comes to schools and families, the word “redistricting” can be as daunting for parents as “final exam” can be for students. Those few letters can signal for some a difficult task ahead, an uncertain future and, perhaps, a lot of blood, sweat and tears to come.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: Sterling examples of personal strength

    Two great lessons of strength played out in Shelby County last week, taught by the golden examples of a pair of teenagers who were unafraid of a bright life and making a salient point.

    First there was 17-year-old Ashley Hilger, who not only executed the admirable but awful task of telling her parents that she was being molested but also doing so in front of a press conference that included TV lights and cameras as part a lawsuit her family had filed against employees of the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services.

  • WHAT WE THINK: You deserve to know what Cabinet knew about Jackleen Lane

    Friday could be a big day for the sad legacy of Jackleen Lane, but we hesitate to raise false hopes. The emphasis must fall squarely on the word “could.”

  • We CONGRATULATE: Those who have filed early for election

    The filing deadline for the 2014 elections remains three weeks away, but we are inspired to see early-bird candidates popping out of political corners to suggest that there could be races in May and November. It’s a trend we would like to see continue at an explosive growth rate.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Test drive is best way to evaluate new health-care law

    We hope you are not falling victim to the irresponsible rhetoric flowing around the launch last week of the Affordable Care Act. Since registration for anyone needing health insurance opened Oct. 1, misinformation and carefully constructed lies seem to have become part of the “instructions” some intend to be read and followed.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: Animal shelter’s new man in charge

    We’re glad to see that there is a new, full-time director of the Shelby County Animal Shelter. That the new leader, Leon Federle, has prior experience at the shelter is an added bonus.

    This is not to diminish the 6-year, interim tenure of Rusty Newton. The shelter has grown and been effective under Mr. Newton’s leadership, and he certainly has set a well-developed and easily followed trail for Mr. Federle to lead the county’s animal control efforts.