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Editorials

  • WHAT WE THINK: Today we celebrate our first responders

    Every year when the calendar strikes Sept. 11, the memories of that awful day 12 years ago come blasting back to the forefront of our consciousness.

    There is nothing that can change the images of airplanes flying into skyscrapers and the Pentagon or the understanding that evil forces wanted to destroy Americans and upset our way of life. It was indescribably horrible and unfathomably confounding. Why would citizens of another country want to sacrifice their lives to create terror and panic?

  • WHAT WE THINK: Railroads have too much power

    A communications gap last week among employees of Norfolk Southern Railroad that frustrated residents and officials in Shelby County was testament to a much larger problem than some blocked crossings that railroaded commuters on the first day of the school year.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: Shelbyville's steps to add trash, recycling service

    Good job by the Shelbyville City Council last week when it conducted an open meeting to review its plans to adopt a citywide curbside and recycling program.

    That was the penultimate appropriate step, to answer questions from and disseminate information to the public about those plans. Next would be the ultimate decision: to pass an ordinance enacting the collection of trash and recyclables from all residences.

  • WHAT WE THINK: We need to know how we failed drowned girl?

    We have spent more than a week now questioning how a 15-year-old girl who by all outward indications had friends, attended school and had relationships and some semblance of a family ends up drowned in a remote, industrial area of Clear Creek on a warm spring morning.

    Such a tragedy is not a normal part of life in Shelby County – if anywhere – and there are important questions that must be asked until we understand how Jackleen Lane, 15, walked away from her life and breathed her final, perhaps troubled breaths.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Shelby County's outlet mall needs to succeed

    The spats and the horror now can be put behind us, and it’s time for all of us to unite and focus on the next big thing in our community:
    An outlet mall is being built in Simpsonville.

    That’s not news, we realize – certainly not to those homeowners who will live in proximity to this 374,000-square-foot enterprise – but the truth of the matter is that the opening next year of the Outlet Shoppes of Louisville creates an important milestone in the evolution of our Shelby County.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Should Shelby County magistrates be OK with expense of new garbage facility?

    We were dismayed last week when there was a meeting of Shelby County Fiscal Court that did not include mention of the decision by the group’s Legislative Committee to step away from the prospect of creating curbside garbage and recycling pickup for residents.

    Surely the magistrates realize that, based on new legislation passed this spring in the General Assembly, they will become responsible for signing off on the budget of the county’s 109 Board, the entity that is responsible for garbage and recycling in the county.

  • WHAT WE THINK: We fear another piece of Shelbyville history is lost

    We get ourselves worked up about topics of important public debate, but when reality reaches out and slaps our cheek with the sting of the fragility of our very core, we can’t help but feel a big tear rolling down our public face.

    That’s because today we can almost see through downtown Shelbyville, its center, decimated in March by the tragic and awful fire that consumed three buildings, again struck by a fire that on Sunday beheaded the beautiful and marvelous old Chatham House on the 600 block of Washington Street.

  • WHAT WE THINK: This is a decision that really smells

    The Shelby County Fiscal Court Legislative Committee’s plan to “step away” from creating curbside garbage and recycling for residents should be trashed.

    This is no time to step away from doing what is right, and there is no mitigating argument that will sway our belief that Shelby Countians should be able to discard trash and recyclables without having to drive somewhere or pay a third party to do so.

  • WHAT WE THINK: There is a the true mission for Shelby County's curbside garbage plan

    With two important meetings this week among officials trying to develop curbside garbage pickup in Shelby County, the mission statement for this project has emerged from the man whose public meetings gave this concept momentum.

    That would be Rusty Newton, chair of the 109 Board, the entity that is in charge of solid-waste pickup in the county. This is what Mr. Newton told officials last week when they gathered to discuss a joint contract between the Shelbyville City Council and Shelby County Fiscal Court:

  • WHAT WE THINK: Recycling must be available to all

    As the process moves forward toward creating countywide curbside garbage and recycling for residents, we want to be sure that all those responsible for making these decisions are reading from the same and appropriate page.

    Certainly, we are encouraged and buoyed to learn that the members of Shelby County Fiscal Court and the Shelbyville City Council are being proactive and working together on this issue. A joint effort on a contract only could help both bodies effectively represent their constituents by providing the best possible rate.