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Editorials

  • We CONGRATULATE: Those who have filed early for election

    The filing deadline for the 2014 elections remains three weeks away, but we are inspired to see early-bird candidates popping out of political corners to suggest that there could be races in May and November. It’s a trend we would like to see continue at an explosive growth rate.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Test drive is best way to evaluate new health-care law

    We hope you are not falling victim to the irresponsible rhetoric flowing around the launch last week of the Affordable Care Act. Since registration for anyone needing health insurance opened Oct. 1, misinformation and carefully constructed lies seem to have become part of the “instructions” some intend to be read and followed.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: Animal shelter’s new man in charge

    We’re glad to see that there is a new, full-time director of the Shelby County Animal Shelter. That the new leader, Leon Federle, has prior experience at the shelter is an added bonus.

    This is not to diminish the 6-year, interim tenure of Rusty Newton. The shelter has grown and been effective under Mr. Newton’s leadership, and he certainly has set a well-developed and easily followed trail for Mr. Federle to lead the county’s animal control efforts.

  • WHAT WE THINK: This seems an A+ for Shelby County students

    In the often-maligned world of public education, aren’t we feeling a balmy, refreshing breeze of good news blowing across Shelby County these days? Haven’t years passed since we last felt so much positive energy involving the education of our students?

  • WE CONGRATULATE: Tegrant’s decision to come to Shelby County

    Welcome to the marketplace, Tegrant Industries. We’re glad to have you join our burgeoning base of support manufacturers to feed the state’s high-powered automotive industries.

    We know your parent company, Sunoco, has a strong working relationship in Kentucky, but we’re glad you chose Shelby County to plant your $12 million stake and hire 51 people. We trust those 51 will come from our collection of zip codes.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Shelby County continues to leave its trash behind

    Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty spoke some simple but vitally important words near the close of last Thursday’s meeting of the city council by saying that his city is drafting an ordinance it soon will introduce to advance the discussion curbside garbage and recycling for its residents.

    There remain many hurdles in place, but Mr. Hardesty’s announcement shows that the leadership of the city quickly is moving toward a visionary decision for the good of all its residents.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: Attorney General’s ruling on records about Jackleen Lane's life

    We might be appearing to gloat if we were to claim a great victory in the decision last week by Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway’s office that would require the Cabinet for Health and Family Services to release its investigative records about the life of Jackleen Lane.

    Certainly The Sentinel-News pursued those records as it sought to understand how a 15-year-old girl would be missing from home for three days without any questions being asked and then to be found dead, having drowned in remote area of Clear Creek.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Fate of Jackleen Lane remains important

    About three months have passed since the body of teenager Jackleen Lane was found in a remote, private area of Clear Creek in Shelbyville, and we continue to get the impression that many would wish that our questions about how she came to be there would be buried along with her remains.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Industrial hemp is growing quickly

    Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer said last week that he expects farmers in the state to be producing industrial hemp by next spring.

    My, has that economic engine turned quickly and driven this machine, which would provide a new, indigenous cash crop for our state, to market with very little delay.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Health-care reform needs your attention

    The Affordable Care Act – love it, hate it or don’t know much about it – will become part of our world and our lives next month.

    The adoption of national health-care reform, an effort to provide medical insurance to Americans who can’t afford it or don’t have access to it and to ensure that coverage is not denied to others because of age or pre-existing conditions, is not embraced by everyone, we understand.