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Editorials

  • What we think: It’s your turn to be leaders

    Your outcry for better accountability by our elected officials and your decry of almost any decision of a fiscal nature have become our foundations of public debate.

    You, the public, often challenge those you elected to do a better job, to listen to the needs of the citizens and not to those of special interests, corporations or other political influencers.

  • What we think: We will miss Clarence Miller

    There’s a high probability that you never met Clarence Miller, though you may well recognize the name. And, if so, his passing last week stole from you and from us an opportunity to know and embrace Mr. Miller’s significant accomplishment and his keen sense of community.
    We often measure a death by the legacy that remains, and with Clarence Miller that legacy is both large and long, his sense of his fellow man and his county both outstanding and exemplary.

  • What we think: ICE's control isn't too cool

    Two recent news reports sadly have merged to bring home with a new and powerful impact an issue that for decades has been troubling not only for the residents of Shelby County but for many across the state and the nation: criminal activity among illegal immigrants.

  • What we think: We have a bridge over troubled waters

    Shelby County Fiscal Court is moving quickly this week to close the Who Da Thot It Bridge – commonly called Jail Hill Bridge – that historic span connecting downtown Shelbyville north from 5th Street. In fact, even as you read this, the bridge already may be closed.

    Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger cited a recent inspection of the bridge by the state as his basis for asking magistrates on Tuesday morning for an executive order to close the bridge immediately as a matter of public safety.

  • We congratulate: A really big -- and good -- show

    Another successful Shelbyville Horse Show has finished its run, and by all accounts its 22nd edition may have been the biggest and best ever.

    Certainly large crowds turned out during the four days, despite sweltering heat, and the number of horses entered grew significantly, bringing in vans from as far away as Texas to compete against the best.

  • What we think: Magisterial slices not always tasty

    The problem with the redrawing of magisterial districts in Shelby County would seem to be one of simple geometry that anyone can appreciate:

    No matter how you slice it, you can’t create seven truly equal pieces of a pie.

    Yet, that’s the problem facing fiscal court as it goes through the suggestion/review process required every 10 years to ensure that each magistrate represents a nearly equal number of residents.

  • We congratulate: School grad rates, long-range plans

    We were extremely pleased to see how significantly Shelby County’s graduation rates have surpassed those of other school districts in the state, based on the new formula adopted for federal No Child Left Behind program.

    We understand that statistics can be misconstrued and misleading, but clearly Shelby County High School was getting students through the receiving line on graduation day. We marveled, too, at the large percentage of African-American and female students who had earned diplomas. These were standard-setting percentages.

  • What we think: Not all budgets have problems

    The ongoing – and seemingly never-ending – debate about the fiscal irresponsibility of the United States government is a tiresome, fearsome and even loathsome process that all of us as taxpayers and voters have to endure and sort through to help us make valued decisions about the capabilities of our elected leadership.

  • What we think: Cordy Armstrong will be missed

    Shelby County lost one of its truest and most dedicated servants last week, when longtime magistrate Cordy Armstrong passed away.

    All you have to do is read the glowing tributes to Mr. Armstrong’s character and commitment – which aren’t always linked when talking about public officials – to understand what those who knew him best and worked alongside him thought of his contributions to our society.

  • What we think: Caution is key in zoning change for recycling plant

    The Triple S Planning Commission acted with great uncertainty in its borderline OK last week for Midwest Metals to build a recycling center on Kentucky Street near Red Orchard Park.

    The concept was approved, 4-3, on Commission Chair Gil Tucker’s tiebreaking vote.

    For the record, Commissioners Scott Merchant, Jake Smith and Larry Stewart supported a zone change from light industrial to heavy industrial, and Commissioners Quintin Biagi Jr., Dudley Bottom and Ed Rudolph opposed. And we thank all of them for their care and diligence with this matter.