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Editorials

  • What we think: Shouldn’t we all be outraged?

    Earlier this summer, a woman named Casey Anthony went on trial under the glaring lights of national TV, charged with murdering her 4-year-old daughter and covering up that crime.

    She became a national lightning rod, a source of vile hate, a person castigated in the streets even when a court found her not guilty of those charges, for which she could have faced the death penalty.

    A tragedy had occurred in the death of Caylee Anthony, to be sure, and it brought with it pure outrage among those who thought the guilty person was getting away with murder.

  • What we think: Our generosity provides lessons

    The generosity of Shelby Countians never ceases to amaze us, but we have to admit to a bit of slack-jawed awe at the amount of money being raised recently to help one another.

    We go back to July to grasp the power of RobFest, which took in more than $30,000 to help Robbie Phillips pay for needed stem cell treatment in Arizona.

  • What we think: This idea for bridge has legs

    We now understand that there is no hope for Who Da Thot It Bridge to remain as a thoroughfare for motorists. The state reneged on its announced plan to repair it – we suggest such announcements in the future be adorned with asterisks – and that Shelby County magistrates are not willing to underwrite the $1 million-plus those repairs would cost.

    But we don’t believe the bridge should be left as a crumbling eyesore just a few hundred feet from Shelbyville City Hall, either.

  • What we think: Fiscal court’s code of silence is wrong

    We were appalled to observe last week that Shelby County Fiscal Court would not accept comments from those in attendance who wanted to address an important zoning matter it is considering for final approval.

    At issue is the controversial reclassification of approximately 10 acres on Kentucky Street to heavy industrial to allow Midwest Metals to build a recycling plant that would be adjacent to Red Orchard Park and residential neighborhoods.

  • We congratulate: Shelby County’s first responders

    There has been an abundance of appropriate attention focused this past week on the first responders who faced peril and sometimes gave their lives during the tragic attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

    At ceremonies in New York, Washington and in a field in Pennsylvania the heroes of that awful day of attacks on America have earned the often prayerful and always prideful praise of society for all they contributed, for the lives they saved and for the ultimate sacrifice that so many made.

  • What we think: We like plan to honor Squire Boone

    The concept being extended by longtime Shelby County native Joe Ruble to build an iconic statue of Squire Boone on the east end of Shelbyville is another significant and – we think – embraceable piece of entrepreneurship by a citizen who loves Shelby County and revels in its history.

  • What we think: State fair winners make us proud

    We love the Kentucky State Fair for many reasons, but one is that we just love seeing our friends and neighbors getting ribbons and prizes for doing what they love most to do.

    This is a time when dedication to talents and hobbies brings attention from everyone, when great cooking, a cool drawing, a beautiful quart of honey, a composed heifer, a perfect bale of hay and, of course, a studly and elegant horse draw the eye of a state and perhaps a nation.

  • What we think: It’s your turn to be leaders

    Your outcry for better accountability by our elected officials and your decry of almost any decision of a fiscal nature have become our foundations of public debate.

    You, the public, often challenge those you elected to do a better job, to listen to the needs of the citizens and not to those of special interests, corporations or other political influencers.

  • What we think: We will miss Clarence Miller

    There’s a high probability that you never met Clarence Miller, though you may well recognize the name. And, if so, his passing last week stole from you and from us an opportunity to know and embrace Mr. Miller’s significant accomplishment and his keen sense of community.
    We often measure a death by the legacy that remains, and with Clarence Miller that legacy is both large and long, his sense of his fellow man and his county both outstanding and exemplary.

  • What we think: ICE's control isn't too cool

    Two recent news reports sadly have merged to bring home with a new and powerful impact an issue that for decades has been troubling not only for the residents of Shelby County but for many across the state and the nation: criminal activity among illegal immigrants.