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Editorials

  • What we think: Sit-down needed for graduation debate

    As you have been reading on these pages these past few weeks, there is an obvious and increasingly vocal disconnect between the parents and supporters of students in our county high schools and the administrators with the school district. We dare say there’s even a disconnect with the school board itself.

    There has lingered in their district for a couple of years now a debate – sometimes raging hotter than others – about how high-achieving students should be honored at commencement.

  • We congratulate: Horse's hero is our hero

    It’s always refreshing to encounter a true hero. It’s even better when the person is unassuming and doing an act of human kindness and care rather than for camera time and, even worse, money.

    But that’s what we have in Rodney Kidd, a police officer in Simpsonville.

  • We congratulate: The development of our new memorial

    The accomplishment of a group of volunteers working mostly under their own power and imagination can be an inspiring thing.

    Thus we are duly impressed by the work of Jerry Miller, Uley Washington, Hobie Henninger and a host of other volunteers who have helped create an elegant memorial to the 22 African-American cavalry officers who were ambushed and died just west of Simpsonville in 1865.

  • What we think: Let’s just fix the sidewalks

    We have followed with interest these past few weeks as a group of downtown-area property owners in Shelbyville have joined forces in the oldest and most common goal that many of us ever seek to undertake: fighting city hall.

  • What we think: Bullitt's bold ban of smoking in public places inspires action

    You may have read recently about a bold new policy decision rendered in Bullitt County.
    Bullitt’s Board of Health voted to make all publicly accessed facilities in the county – including some parks and outdoor areas – smoke free.
    We find this an intriguing step in the debate between smokers’ rights and the greater good of public health. Their concept also is far more wide-ranging and stringent than policies passed by legislative bodies across Kentucky.

  • We congratulate: More good news for Shelby County's economy

    The preliminary approval of state incentives announced Thursday for Ficosa North America is the latest in a surge of terrific economic news for Shelby County.
    Following announced plans at Martinrea Heavy Stamping, Katayama and Shelby Industries, we are now up to four the number of companies that will be adding jobs in the coming years.

  • What we think: Criminal penalties seem too lenient

    We are starting to wonder if there are any cells available in our state prisons, because we are becoming increasingly alarmed at high-profile crimes that are going unpunished by incarceration.
    This is said neither to renew our shock at the meager wrist slapping given to admitted office thief Jody Wills nor to condemn any particular judge for his or her rulings.
    But rather this is a focus on the crime-and-punishment system, because there are examples it’s not working like we would expect it to work.

  • We congratulate: Kentucky's basketball success stories

    No matter which colors dominate your wardrobe or tint your vision of the sports world, surely you can embrace the success stories that our state generated on the basketball court this past weekend.
    Chatter is everywhere, of course, about the University of Kentucky’s first return to the NCAA Tournament’s Final Four since the Clinton Administration. The Wildcats’ run has been remarkable and somewhat unexpected by anyone other than the deepest blue fans.

  • What we think: Census figures show what we already knew

    By now you have read the description of the new statistical face of Shelby County as drawn by the 2010 census. We doubt you were surprised any more than we were about what this analysis discerned about our community.
    To understand that Shelby County has seen burgeoning growth in the past decade – 38 percent more residents than in 2000 – doesn’t require a degree in statistics or even a detailed market analysis.
    We’ve seen the growth just by driving around our communities.

  • We congratulate: Shelby County's academy plans for high schools

    Shelby County Public Schools’ plan to create and implement high-performance academies for its best high school students is a step of great value for all of Shelby County.