.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Editorials

  • What we think:You have a duty to vote Tuesday

    We are concerned about projections we are hearing that most of you are planning to skip your appointment at your polling precinct on Tuesday.

    Statewide projections are that barely more than one in four registered voters will exercise that right and duty in choosing our next governor and other state leaders.

    We don’t really understand. We can’t grasp why any person 18 years and older would not register to vote and then do so at the appropriate times.

  • What we think: Montell's bill deserves a look

    State Rep. Brad Montell (R-Shelbyville) last week took a new and hopeful stab at addressing a problem that we all recognize and rebuke: the hiring of illegal immigrants.

    His proposal – to require those most likely to hire undocumented workers to go through a specific process of ensuring the legal residency of those individuals – is not entirely original, but it at least keeps open the discussion of an idea that could help solve a problem that costs our country, state and county millions of tax dollars annually.

  • We congratulate: Equestrian Burnett for Pan Am silver

    It makes sense that the horse industry would bring Shelby County serious recognition in the big-time international sports arena.

    On Sunday in Mexico, Hannah Sue Burnett, formerly of Finchville, staked a claim to a spot in the 2012 U.S. Olympics by winning a silver medal in eventing at the Pan American Games.

    Ms. Burnett, who was no worse than third aboard Harbour Pilot throughout the 3-day competition, also was the highest-ranking scorer on the gold-medal-winning U.S. team.

  • What we think: Sheriff’s office made repairs happen

    We are thankful this week that the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office continued to be vigilant about deadly accidents on Interstate 64 in eastern Shelby County.

    While we have had our eyes focused on the dangerous problem posed by the eastbound ramp at Exit 32, ensuring that the Shelbyville Bypass was completed and myriad other transportation issues, Sheriff Mike Armstrong and Detective Jason Rice were doing what we pay them to do: protecting our citizens.

  • We congratulate: Another bright light in helping others

    Another person in need, another big dollop of support from the citizens of Shelby County: It seems we find these examples every month, when our neighbors step forward with generosity to help one of our own.

    The most recent example was the Save Savannah’s Sight event, coordinated by Shelby County Community Charities, to help raise the money needed for surgery to restore the vision of Savannah Sanders.

  • What we think: All candidates need to stop here

    We were encouraged to see that David Williams, the Republican candidate for governor, came to Shelby County recently and had an early morning roundtable to discuss his platform and answer questions.

    Mr. Williams, the state Senate president, spent an hour talking with familiar faces, explaining his policies in detail and then answering a few harmless questions.

  • We congratulate: Fiscal court’s zoning decision

    Shelby County Fiscal Court did the right thing in rejecting the zone change Midwest Metals had requested near Red Orchard Park.

    We believe that Magistrate Eddie Kingsolver addressed the appropriate issues in his motion to deny the request, citing the fundamental point that it was not in agreement with the county’s long-range plan and that there was no mitigating reason for fiscal court to change that plan.

  • What we think: Triple S acted according to plan

    There was no close vote or public hemming and hawing in the most recent big decision made by the Triple S Planning Commission: Commissioners voted unanimously to deny the City of Shelbyville’s request to rezone 73 acres on the corner of Harrington Mill Road and Freedom’s Way from agriculture to light industrial.

  • We congratulate: Readiness rates of our students

    We feel a little like a student in a statistics class because of the avalanche of data about the performance and progress of Shelby County’s Public School students that has covered our heads this past week.

    To be able to digest the reports from the state’s about-to-be-dead KCCT tests, the federal governments’ trying-to-be-dead No Child Left Behind and the new buzzword of development – college and career readiness – is overwhelming to just about anyone who doesn’t get paid to spend full days evaluating what the numbers say.

  • What we think: Shouldn’t we all be outraged?

    Earlier this summer, a woman named Casey Anthony went on trial under the glaring lights of national TV, charged with murdering her 4-year-old daughter and covering up that crime.

    She became a national lightning rod, a source of vile hate, a person castigated in the streets even when a court found her not guilty of those charges, for which she could have faced the death penalty.

    A tragedy had occurred in the death of Caylee Anthony, to be sure, and it brought with it pure outrage among those who thought the guilty person was getting away with murder.