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Editorials

  • What we think: I-64 ramp repair is right thing to do

    Gov. Steve Beshear has placed the state transportation cabinet in the fast lane to save lives in Shelby County, and we could not be more grateful.

    His endorsement Monday of plans to move ahead with modifications for the abbreviated and lethal acceleration lane from KY 55 onto Interstate 64 eastbound in Shelby County is not to be underestimated in making these 300 feet of asphalt safer for all who encounter it.

  • We congratulate: Redistricting plan keeps Shelby whole

    The redistricting plans for the state’s House and Senate leaders appear to be complete, and Shelby County has avoided the dubious and unsavory slicing that has affected so many of the counties around us.

    You can’t imagine how important it is that state Rep. Brad Montell (R-Shelbyville) and state Sen. Paul Hornback (R-Shelbyville) continue to represent all Shelby Countians and not just those on one side of an arbitrarily selected road.

  • What we think: Handling of property is quite curious

    We continue to find unusual the City of Shelbyville’s approach to a parcel of land it apparently wants within its boundaries.

    We speak of the roughly 73 acres owned by Shelby County Magistrate Allen Ruble and his brother Tom on the southwest corner of Harrington Mill Road and Freedom’s Way, aka the Shelbyville Bypass.

  • We congratulate: One of our own who is a winner

    What a heart-warming story it was for a young woman whose bloodlines seep deep into Shelby County’s fabric to wear the sash of Miss Kentucky across the stages of Las Vegas last week.

    We speak of the Miss America pageant on Saturday and the heritage of Ann-Blair Thornton, who grew from the gene pool of the Borders family in Shelby County.

    Most of you know Bill and Ann Borders, part of the former ownership of Smith-McKenney Drug Co. Perhaps you know their children or even some of their grandchildren. Ann-Blair Thornton of Bowling Green is one of them.

  • What we think: We need closure on shooting

    It was important to learn last week that a grand jury in Shelby County found that two Shelbyville police officers showed proper judgment and had no recourse in their deadly confrontation with a teenager last fall.

    We wish that the tragedy that spins around this horrible moment would have such a simple ending, but we don’t think it can.

    We cling to the hope that  the continuing debate also won’t have an equally tragic outcome.

  • We congratulate: New hospital system – with some caveats

    Shelby County’s community hospital now has new ownership, and we’re glad at least that piece of the drama about the facility’s future is complete.

    We don’t know what impact OneKentucky Heath System ultimately will have in Shelby County – and we remain concerned about that – but at least the merger processes surrounding its future are signed and, for the time being, sealed.

  • What we think: Here are our community goals for 2012

    It’s the time of year when we as individuals pause to organize our thoughts going forward, circle some dates on our calendar and prepare goals for where we want to be at the end of December. Some of us call these resolutions, but those tend to be tied to regiments that don’t really fit our lives and evaporate before the ground thaws.

  • What we think: Lots of progress occurred in 2011

    When we first sat down to measure Shelby County’s success against the goals we had set for it last January, we were expecting to be disappointed. Had we really accomplished anything on our list other than getting a commitment from state highway officials to do an early remedy for the dangerous Exit 32, eastbound from KY 55 onto Interstate 64?

    That was stellar work, to be sure, but we also know that there could be difficulty designating the dollars required to accommodate a project we were told could begin next year. Does that tinge this tout?

  • What we think: New judicial center is money well spent

    Shelby Countians awoke this morning to perhaps the most wonderful new public facility in the more than 200 years of our history – the Shelby County Judicial Center.

    We don’t know how residents in the early 1900s reacted to the opening of the Shelby County Courthouse, and we set aside the oooos and aaaaaahs for new schools, because those tend to happen and bring new educational wonders every decade or two.

    But we believe the center on the corner of 4th and Main streets in Shelbyville is a building of which all residents should be proud.

  • We congratulate: All the ways we celebrate the holiday season

    Some have labeled us as Sentinel-News Scrooges for suggesting that the Celebration of Lights in Shelbyville is scheduled too early and infringes on Thanksgiving.

    We still believe that it is, but we will set that aside for now to recognize another dead-on Santa certainty:
    Lots of people in Shelby County love to celebrate the holidays.