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Editorials

  • What we think: These are losing battles for Shelbyville's property owners

    The city of Shelbyville’s determination to begin an aggressive crackdown on property owners who don’t follow the city’s ordinances is both strong in might and clear in hindsight.

    City leaders said last week that they plan again to pursue homeowners who aren’t making required repairs in sidewalks that abut their property and that they would foreclose on property owners who are arrears in their taxes.

  • What we think: We need to be ready, be safe

    The emergency management leadership in Shelby County is worried about us, and so are we.

    Those horrible storms that surged across Indiana and Kentucky last week – narrowly skirting Shelby County – scared the bluegrass out of us. They were not just overblown thunderstorms but powerful, twisting trains that crawled across the landscape.

    And those who died in some cases did so because they weren’t ready.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Property owners have responsibilities

    A troubling scenario has unfolded during the past couple of weeks about a conflict between residents and their landlords that has opened a seeping wound on the generally lovely complexion of downtown Shelbyville.

    Several residents who rent apartments of some fashion from Greg Wood Properties were left for a period of time without utilities even though they say they had paid for those services in their rent payments to Mr. Wood’s company.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: A new company coming to Shelby

    We’re happy to see another international company putting up its banner and moving employees into Shelby County.

    Brown Jordan Inc., the world’s No. 1 maker of high-end casual and outdoor furniture, will open its showroom and warehouse in Kingbrook Industrial Park in Simpsonville next week, relocating from storm-ravaged Haleyville, Ala., to be nearer Brown Jordan’s headquarters in Louisville.

  • What we think: Questions abound about Hornback’s bill

    Paul Hornback is in his second full year of representing Shelby County in the state Senate, and he is starting to step into the sometimes squishy purchase of both political position and important decision.
    He also will begin to see that those processes will begin to erode his legislative honeymoon with his constituents, depending upon their perspectives.

  • What we think: We need to know about T.S. Baxter

    Were you as amazed as we were to read the story of Thomas Samuel “T.S.” Baxter, the first African-American elected to Shelbyville City Council, where he served for almost two decades before being gerrymandered out of his seat because of his race?

    We discovered Mr. Baxter as a small photograph in Portrait of the Past, Shelby County Kentucky 1865-1980. In fact, the caption beneath his photograph was the only clue we had to the story of T.S. Baxter.

  • What we think: Let’s bulldoze before we annex

    The owners of the former Wesley Apartments, on the corner of U.S. 50 and Freedom’s Way, now are asking to be annexed into the city of Shelbyville, and the city council has given that request its first approval.

    We’re not opposed to having the property annexed – in fact, we think it should be and positioned for new businesses – but why on earth would the city want to accept this excruciating eyesore as it now exists?

  • We congratulate: Shelby’s public garden project

    The new garden plots that the North Central Health Department and Shelby County Fiscal Court have laid out for free public use in Shelbyville are a bloomin’ good idea.

    We like the fact that some awkward space at the intersections of 11th Street, Kentucky Street and Equity Street, which could have been a magnet for new concrete, has been prepared for the ultimate in green endeavors.

    We can’t think of a better initiative to promote public health for the health department to embrace.

  • What we think: Education needs new funding formula

    Recently members of the Shelby County Board of Education met with our elected leaders and gave them quite an elementary lesson in public education’s most well-known subject: Your budget is killing us.

    That, of course, required no piece of post-graduate analysis for anyone elected to any office in this state or for parents who pay careful attention to how their children’s needs are being met by the annual outlay of tax dollars.

    The chants on both sides are loud, clear and enumerated with valid points, if not universal solutions.

  • What we think: Recyled idea works better

    The saga involving Midwest Metals’ desire to open a facility in Shelby County seems to be on the road to an appropriate conclusion, which leaves us to ponder why there was such an unnecessary detour along the way.

    Midwest Metals, the recycling company, earned approval from the Triple S Board of Appeals on Thursday night to construct its collection complex on Windhurst Way, basically across the street from the acreage set aside for the new Shelby County Convenience Center adjacent to the Shelby County Industrial Park.