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Editorials

  • What we think: We don’t like Homecoming match

    On Friday night at Collins High School’s newly reopened turf field, the Titans will play host to rival Shelby County High School for the second time in their three years of existence.

    The first two games between these two have not been close, but this one looks on paper like it might be a real battle, indicative of a balancing of the playing field and the emergence of a true – if not simply geographic – rivalry. This should be a spectacle and a lot of fun for everyone.

    Except for one thing:

  • We congratulate: School board’s look at grades

    The Shelby County School Board has taken lot of constructive criticism recently about its actions relative to the tax assessments for this fiscal year. Some residents are asking hard questions about the decisions and the processes related to those assessments, and we will be watching this commentary unfold as it relates to the elections for the seats in three districts –  two contested –  this November.

  • What we think: Our 911 response could be in danger

    We are hearing the calls to 911 about the 911 system, and they are alarms to which we all must respond. The very safety of you and your neighbors could depend on whether these calls for help are heard in the locally knowledgeable manner to which we have become accustomed. We fear that practice soon could become obsolete.

    At issue here are the charges for telephone lines that are collected from each of our bills and then funneled to state and local governments to pay for the infrastructure of the emergency response service to which you connect when you dial 911.

  • We congratulate: Recycling ideas that are all new

    As we continue to see the dirty work of residents who toss trash onto pastureland and cigarettes onto streets as if those were swinging-door receptacles for their refuse, we are encouraged when we see institutions taking responsibility for making our county more energy conscious, our environment more sustainable and our young people more encouraged about both.

  • What we think: Danger remains on deadly ramp

    We’re relieved that state Sen. Paul Hornback (R-Shelbyville) has our collective backs when it comes to our safety during the reconstruction of the eastbound ramp onto Interstate 64 from KY 55. We fear that if Sen. Hornback weren’t vigilant that those of us who drive this ramp regularly or occasionally would be dealing for the next two years with even more danger than we have come to expect.

  • We congratulate: Simpsonville for listening to residents

    We are proud of the Simpsonville City Commission for its handling of the zoning change application by Horizon Properties Group, which wants to build an outlet mall on the southern side of the city.

    Whether you support the zoning change for 24 acres from Agriculture  and Commerical to Interchange – making the parcel absolutely appropriate for the mall – or support construction of the mall itself, surely you must feel that due process has been well served.

  • What we think:It’s time for Shelby County to dive into being ‘wet’

    We understand the recent reluctance by members of Shelby County Fiscal Court to provide the property for the city of Shelbyville once again to expand its tax base.

  • We congratulate: Our celebrations of community

    Another Labor Day has passed, which is when the communities of Waddy and now Martinsville officially set in motion some of Shelby County’s wonderful traditions: the fall season of community festivals.

    Bagdad and Mount Eden have their days in the spring and summer, but the fall – or the late-summer days leading up to it – have become the gathering time for all aspects of our communities.

  • What we think: Simpsonville now should answer

    Now that Horizon Group Properties has received approval from the Triple S Planning Commission on its request to rezone several acres of Simpsonville to be appropriate as a site for its planned outlet mall, this question now comes down to the final affirmation or rejection by the Simpsonville City Commission.

  • We congratulate: Holding line on property tax

    None of us likes increases in our taxes, and we are fortunate that Shelby County Fiscal Court and the Shelbyville City Council have for most of this century been able to hold firm on their rates for property taxes.

    In a era when so many legislative bodies are going broke and screaming for revenue streams, we should not underestimate the import that these two paramount taxing agencies are able to refrain from boosting cash flow.