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Editorials

  • We congratulate: Creators of sensational idea

    Sometime over the years the Shelby County Fair evolved into a pageant of pageants.

    What began in 1842 as a celebration of farm life and livestock has evolved in 2012 to be a celebration of our children on display like a lot of that livestock, and we venture there are more of the former than the latter entered at the fair.

    What for decades was a baby show and a beauty contest for young women now has expanded into a days-long, multi-age-group competition among girls and boys, which would beg the question about whether we have taken this too far.

  • What we think: 2 outlet mall plans increase the odds

    If this were Las Vegas, we would say all bets on an outlet mall being built near Simpsonville are now “double down.”

    That’s blackjack lingo, of course, for doubling your bets on the cards in front of you, and those who would want an outlet mall in Shelby County now have two cards to play toward reaching that goal.

  • What we think: George Cottrell leaves a testimony

    The passing of George Cottrell at such an early age will be felt in Shelby County not only by his large and loving family but also by the public in general.

    For Mr. Cottrell, who died last week after battling amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS – Lou Gehrig’s Disease), not only was a motivating coach, an inspiring teacher and  a fount of incredible talent, but he was one of those true and fleeting elements for many of us: a role model.

  • What congratulate: Another great day for men’s health

    Another Men’s Health Fair has passed at Jewish Hospital Shelbyville, and this year’s affair was better attended than its 11 predecessors.

    Hundreds of men flocked for hundreds of dollars of free medical screenings that ultimately  could save or extend their lives, and in so doing they were the beneficiaries of one of the great services provided to our community.

  • What we think: We need answers in huge drug bust

    The case against Enrique Olvera-Landaverde continues to perplex us. In fact, we don’t know if there is a case against Mr. Olvera-Landaverde. This all reads to us like lawyers run amok in a John Grisham novel.

    If Mr. Olvera-Landaverde’s name does not ring familiar, you may recall that this is the man arrested when county and state police, operating on a tip from Mr. Olvera-Landaverde’s wife, raided his home near Southville in 2010 and collected nearly 800 pounds of marijuana and $60,000 in cash.

  • What we think: What will you learn this week?

    We know there can be bureaucratic answers to many questions that befuddle us about why things are the way they are, but that does not preclude our asking one question we suspect is on the minds of many this week:
    Why are students in school from now through June 4? Because they are required by state law to have 1062 hours – about 177 days – of “instruction.”

    But we question whether there is any real instruction being given on these last few days.

  • We congratulate: Those students who return to finish

    There are inspirational stories at the end of every school year, tales of students, young and old, who have persevered, diligently fought against odds and overcome adversity.

    In fact, to the dictum of having students “college and career ready” – which we embrace wholeheartedly – we add these examples of students who leave school “life ready.”

  • What we think: Voters must care about Election Day

    With the Primary Election now all counted and complete, most of our eyes will be affixed on the names that will appear at the top of the ballot in November. We don’t doubt Barack Obama and Mitt Romney will have a spirited slugfest as they try to woo Kentucky’s voters and electoral votes.

    But our greater focus this fall will be on the undercard of their heavyweight bout, the faces in the races to see who will emerge from our counties and neighborhoods to lead decision-making in our community for the next two to four years.

  • We congratulate: Our champions who set the pace

    One of the things we like most to do is to congratulate our young people on their success stories, and this is the time of year when that happens most frequently – with graduation, scholarships and the never-ending lists on Awards Night at our high schools.

    But on Friday night, in a stadium in Louisville, three Shelby Countians stepped forward and established themselves at the best at what they do against their peers from around the state.

  • What we think: The joke of redistricting is on us

    There remain many laps in the race for congress in House District 4, but no matter who wins at the polls on May 22, we get the distinct impression that Shelby Countians are going to lose.
    There are nine candidates – seven Republicans and two Democrats – vying for the seat held for four terms by Republican Geoff Davis, but even newer than those candidates is the presence of Shelby County in a congressional district that has its seat of power in the Northern Kentucky suburbs of Cincinnati.