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Editorials

  • What we think: New school testing misses key element

    Like most everyone else, we are continuing to try to digest the results we read last week from the state’s new accountability tests for public schools.

    Like Shelby County Superintendent James Neihof, we “continue to feel challenged” by what we saw.

    Whether you think standardized testing works or whether this particular set of processes is appropriate, this is the system through which we for the foreseeable future will educate our students and evaluate our teachers and administrators.

  • What we think: Let’s choose wisely on Nov. 6

    Many candidates have lined up to serve you, and on Tuesday you will have a chance to choose among them, which is a far from simple process. Both candidates and voters have much responsibility on Election Day.

    These candidates have presented themselves to you, shown you in many ways who they are and the issues and principles that have formed their candidacies, and now it’s up to you to sort through all those messages and make the choice that best serves your needs.

  • We congratulate: A student who has guts

    We are in awe of Claire Kelly. We wish we had just half her courage and determination.

    In case you aren’t familiar with Ms. Kelly, she’s the junior from Shelby County High School who on Thursday rappelled down the 30-story Lexington Financial Center.

    And why did Ms. Kelly do this? Well, because it was there.

    She’s part of the Venture Club, an affiliate of scouting, but this bouncing ride from on high primarily stemmed from her commitment to ad-venture.

  • A piece of history at an historical place

     

    When you have a special celebration, don’t you like to do something unique and make some personal history? There’s nothing like putting a red-lettered date in neon and setting a bar that you may not reach again, is there?

  • What we think: This amendment should be shot down

    On Nov. 6, among the many important decisions voters will be asked to make is one that they should not make: to pass an amendment to the state constitution that establishes hunting and fishing as legacy activities in the state.

    That is shorthand language for the Personal Right to Hunt and Fish Amendment, which was placed on the ballot by a quick and somewhat quietly authored House Bill 1 that passed the legislature earlier this year and became part of the election process without so much as a peep from the legislature.

  • We congratulate: SCOPE adds value to election process

    The election process would not be the same in Shelby County without the commitment of the leadership of the Shelby County Organized for Preservation and Enhancement – or SCOPE – and that organization’s commitment to this process.

    Once again this year, SCOPE organized and sponsored with The Sentinel-News the annual Candidate Forum. This has been happening every two years since 1988, and it is an established part of the election calendar.

  • What we think: Old Shelby murder case needs new look

    Did Susan King of Mount Eden murder her former boyfriend Kyle “Deanie” Breeden of Shelbyville in 1998?

    That question, which for years haunted investigators and Mr. Breeden’s family, was thought to be at rest in 2008, when Ms. King was sent to prison.

    But now we have our own new set of questions about this case, including not only how the investigation has been handled but also who has a responsibility to ensure that Ms. King in fact did commit this crime.

  • What we think: Shelby County should guard against narrow roads

    We have a suggestion for Carl Henry, the new czar of parking in Shelby County.

    Mr. Henry, whose title actually is the county’s road supervisor, was given by Shelby County Fiscal Court the right to set parking regulations on all streets and roads under the county’s jurisdiction.

  • We congratulate: Voter registration growth, but don't stop there

    We were pleased to learn recently that the number of registered voters in Shelby County has increased since we last elected a president.

    That’s always encouraging, and because as our populace grows, we need those of age to do their constitutional – and moral – duty by becoming involved in the electorate process.

    The number of adults in Shelby County who have filed their paperwork to vote in this election is nearly 28,000, which is a strong percentage of those who are eligible.

    That’s the good news, but it also is not enough.

  • What we think: Take this as a signal: No lights on bypass

    We are if nothing else consistent in our efforts to provide encouragement and guidance for the people who build and manage the roads in our county, and we’re not planning to stop.

    And we feel that when the state Transportation Cabinet isn’t asking, that’s when engineers and officials are in the greatest need of our advice. So here’s today’s suggestion: Forget about placing more traffic signals on the Shelbyville Bypass.