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Editorials

  • WHAT WE THINK: We are waiting for smoke to clear

    We aren’t certain just yet if we want to embrace the downhill snowball that the legalization of industrial hemp has become, but all this discussion and rapid movement by our elected leaders certainly have our undivided attention.

    That state Sen. Paul Hornback (R-Shelbyville) was able to push his bill to accommodate hemp through the state Senate in just a couple of weeks of the session is remarkable. That he had an all-star lineup of Republican endorsements is impressive.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: An exponential mathematics star

    We can’t imagine a student having a better senior year than Sam Saarinen. Certainly, he is making Shelby County look very good in the educational world.

    In case you haven’t been keeping up with Sam, a student at the Gatton Academy of Mathematics in Bowling Green, let us tell you just what he has accomplished.

    First, he made a perfect score on the American College Test, something only a few hundred students do each year.

  • WHAT WE THINK: The lights finally are coming on

    Shelby County so often has appeared to be moving in the slow lane when it comes to matters of highways and byways – see the Shelbyville Bypass, if you will – that our recent giddiness about the expedited replacement for the deadly interchange at KY 55 and Interstate 64 sometimes seems like a bit of a dream.

    That project is moving along quickly, right through the winter months, and we would have bet our asphalt that we wouldn’t have seen such activity in our lifetimes. We only can assume a more dedicated contractor was hired this time.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: A new event that could make history

    The presentation Sunday at Stratton Center about the bits and pieces of recorded African-American history in Shelby County is the wonderful culmination of a long-since-due step in preserving that piece of our ancestral pie.

    We often feel that much of the story of African-Americans in the nearly 221 years of Shelby County are lost in the anecdotes and in the dwindling in the memories of a few in our county. There are so many rich stories that we fear would be lost, if not for the dedication of the volunteers from the Shelby County Historical Society.

  • What we think: It’s your time to talk trash

    The 109 Board in Shelby County is doing one thing we heartily applaud: It scheduled five public-input sessions at various locations across the county to gather your thoughts on its plans for a new garbage/recycling center and its idea of charging you to drop your trash there.

    The first of those sessions was Tuesday night in Simpsonville, and another will be held tonight at the Shelby County Health Department in Shelbyville. There are also sessions Thursday in Finchville, next Monday in Bagdad and Tuesday in Waddy.

  • We congratulate: Our need to give – which may grow

    Fundraising season is upon us, that time of year when we launch into an annual parade of events that raise much-needed revenue to support a variety of philanthropic efforts in Shelby County.

    This past weekend featured the cultural gamut of Ducks Unlimited – with its Duck Dynasty theme this year – to one of Shelby County’s glitziest gatherings, Tres Chic.

  • What we think: Shelby County's new garbage fee idea really stinks

    If you own property in Shelby County, you pay 3.5 percent of that property’s taxable value for what you might consider to be garbage service. This is what you receive for that payment: A “convenience center” in Waddy that is maintained and emptied, a recycling center that is staffed and an opportunity to transport your garbage or recyclables to those facilities.

    What you don’t get is garbage service.

  • What we think: Taxing districts need to answer

    We now have a clearer picture of how many of our tax dollars this year will be going to the 16 separate taxing districts around our county. At least the property tax payments recorded by Sheriff Mike Armstrong have showed us how our hard-earned $30 million is being divvied up.

    Yet, although we have this dollar amount and a thread of an idea about the tax distribution, we truly don’t know how that ball of yarn unwinds.

    And we owe you an apology.

    We simply should have been watching more closely and offering you more information along the way.

  • We congratulate: Brenda Jackson’s deserved award

    Brenda Jackson has served Shelby County Public Schools long and well and, as she has sworn to do, she has put the kids ahead of herself. Her methods can be questioned, as they were last fall when she fought off a challenger to win her seventh term representing District 5 on the Shelby County School Board, but you can’t debate what is in her heart, for she lives from that heart every time she takes her seat on the platform for a board meeting.

    Ms. Jackson is all about the kids and making sure they get the best education this county can provide.

  • What we think: Let’s try a new idea on debt, gun issues

    The topics of greatest collision these days in our national discourse are the centrifugal – if not central – debates about the oversight of our economy and of our right to bear arms.

    Almost every person in leadership at every level of our governments – and many of us lowly taxpayers – is debating one side or the other of one topic or the other, some wanting to choke the reins of control while others want at least to maintain the freedom of movement now in place. Oddly the chokers and the relaxers are not consistent along the political spectrum.