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Editorials

  • What we think: Williamses’ lawsuit won’t settle anything

    We are not surprised that the death one year ago of Trey F. Williams now will become part of the civic legal process as his family seeks to understand and accept his death at the hands of a Shelbyville Police officer.

    Last Nov. 19, Mr. Williams was in his grandmother’s house when officers Suzanna Marcum and Frank Willoughby found him there while investigating a call about a potential prowler. A struggle ensued, and Ms. Marcum fatally shot Mr. Williams, 18.

  • What we think: Replacing Shelby County parks director will be no day in the park

    The stunning retirement announcement last week by Shelby County Parks Director Clay Cottongim has left us as startled and grasping at the future as we are sure it has those on the county’s parks board and its foundation.

    Mr. Cottongim, it would seem, is the Shelby County Parks system. There are hundreds of people  who contribute to the success of an admirable system, but this program has at the very least has been Mr. Cottongim’s foster child if not his actual baby.

  • We congratulate: This true example of the Chirstmas spirit

    The holiday spirit was alive and well in Shelbyville on Saturday night, and we’re not referring specifically to the Celebration of Lights, although the 25th anniversary of that festival was widely attended and a wonderful success.

    We speak, no, of the fabulous example of giving that was the presentation of a wheelchair-accessible van to Margaret Hall and her son, Glenn, during that celebration.

  • We congratulate: The truest of champions, Gabriella Karas

    You have to love someone who sets a lofty goal and then, by golly, goes and accomplishes that goal. Our most recent example of that is from Gabriella Karas, a freshman cross-country runner at Collins High School.

    Ms. Karas’s surname is nothing new to our congratulatory notes. Her sister, Caterina, two years ago won a state cross-country title and set a course record at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington. She also won several track titles.

  • What we think: We wish election would bring action

    We always feel this way after an Election Day on which a president is chosen: It’s time to get started to work, but can anything really be accomplished?

    We have had month upon unending month of points made, refuted, remade, refuted and other infinite cycles. Nothing really was accomplished except to create a truly contentious election season, and, truth be known, until the Electoral College votes, we really haven’t decided anything.

  • What we think: New school testing misses key element

    Like most everyone else, we are continuing to try to digest the results we read last week from the state’s new accountability tests for public schools.

    Like Shelby County Superintendent James Neihof, we “continue to feel challenged” by what we saw.

    Whether you think standardized testing works or whether this particular set of processes is appropriate, this is the system through which we for the foreseeable future will educate our students and evaluate our teachers and administrators.

  • What we think: Let’s choose wisely on Nov. 6

    Many candidates have lined up to serve you, and on Tuesday you will have a chance to choose among them, which is a far from simple process. Both candidates and voters have much responsibility on Election Day.

    These candidates have presented themselves to you, shown you in many ways who they are and the issues and principles that have formed their candidacies, and now it’s up to you to sort through all those messages and make the choice that best serves your needs.

  • We congratulate: A student who has guts

    We are in awe of Claire Kelly. We wish we had just half her courage and determination.

    In case you aren’t familiar with Ms. Kelly, she’s the junior from Shelby County High School who on Thursday rappelled down the 30-story Lexington Financial Center.

    And why did Ms. Kelly do this? Well, because it was there.

    She’s part of the Venture Club, an affiliate of scouting, but this bouncing ride from on high primarily stemmed from her commitment to ad-venture.

  • A piece of history at an historical place

     

    When you have a special celebration, don’t you like to do something unique and make some personal history? There’s nothing like putting a red-lettered date in neon and setting a bar that you may not reach again, is there?

  • What we think: This amendment should be shot down

    On Nov. 6, among the many important decisions voters will be asked to make is one that they should not make: to pass an amendment to the state constitution that establishes hunting and fishing as legacy activities in the state.

    That is shorthand language for the Personal Right to Hunt and Fish Amendment, which was placed on the ballot by a quick and somewhat quietly authored House Bill 1 that passed the legislature earlier this year and became part of the election process without so much as a peep from the legislature.