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Editorials

  • WE CONGRATULATE: We congratulate Shelby’s efforts in great Crusade

    Another WHAS Crusade for Children has come and gone – 60 of them now – and the generosity of Shelby Countians contributed significantly to the more than $6 million collected this year.

    Most of that comes, of course, from fire departments around the county who open their arms and set their clocks by the collection schedule for this annual telethon to help disabled and underserved children.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Board deserves an “F” for forgot

    Sometimes mathematical problems can be a bit complex, and we have observed that the members of the Shelby County School Board have found a few equations they can’t quite solve. Certainly, there are several variables in each, but there’s an operation or algorithm that apparently is quite difficult to decipher.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: Focus of students on difficult road

    We read the reports, and you likely are as amazed as are we. Shelby County’s high school students have earned millions of dollars of scholarships and awards that not only underscore their hard work and academic excellence but also reinforce the careers that some seem entrenched to pursue.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Medicaid decision could provide care

    We understand that expansion of the Medicaid plan as part of the Affordable Care Act is seen as a political football, a topic to be kicked back and forth across a field of ideology with not a whole lot of regard for the players involved.

    We also admit that we don’t have the sufficient grasp of either the process or economics to reinforce the decision last week by Gov. Steve Beshear to expand the rolls and open up the possibility that perhaps 300,000 more Kentuckians can have access to health insurance.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: Idea of raising pay for teachers in Shelby County

    We were pleased to see that the Shelby County Board of Education will hear this week a formal proposal to provide teachers a pay raise in the coming fiscal year.

    Teachers are under fire continually – as is our educational system in general, it would seem – and many of them are taking those bullets for barely enough money to make a decent living.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Should Shelby County magistrates be OK with expense of new garbage facility?

    We were dismayed last week when there was a meeting of Shelby County Fiscal Court that did not include mention of the decision by the group’s Legislative Committee to step away from the prospect of creating curbside garbage and recycling pickup for residents.

    Surely the magistrates realize that, based on new legislation passed this spring in the General Assembly, they will become responsible for signing off on the budget of the county’s 109 Board, the entity that is responsible for garbage and recycling in the county.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: Foundation’s new dollar match plan

    What a great idea the Shelby County Community Foundation has initiated by creating a plan to help nonprofit groups help themselves.

    We always have been troubled by any group that seems to exist only for grants and handouts from corporations. We appreciate those who do the work, build themselves and are rewarded for that effort.

  • WHAT WE THINK: It’s time to extend Discovery Boulevard

    The somewhat scary but mostly frustrating situation that evolved on Monday at Collins High School – when the school received a “security breach” that ultimately earned the students an extra day before end-of-school tests and an early ride home – brought to light an issue that we have feared could be key as the school became settled in its location and routine.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: The honoring of our musicical legacy

    Some remarkably talented and inspirational people will get a wonderful compliment this weekend, when former students of Ernie Threlkeld, Susie Saunders and Mel Owen will play a jazz concert in tribute to these fabulous music teachers, who passed away in recent years.

  • WHAT WE THINK: We fear another piece of Shelbyville history is lost

    We get ourselves worked up about topics of important public debate, but when reality reaches out and slaps our cheek with the sting of the fragility of our very core, we can’t help but feel a big tear rolling down our public face.

    That’s because today we can almost see through downtown Shelbyville, its center, decimated in March by the tragic and awful fire that consumed three buildings, again struck by a fire that on Sunday beheaded the beautiful and marvelous old Chatham House on the 600 block of Washington Street.