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Editorials

  • WE CONGRATULATE: Another fantastic fair

    Despite a rain-filled week, fairgoers were treated to another fun-filled Shelby County Fair.

    The conclusion of the fair is a sad day for fair fans and a happy day for organizers, who devote countless hours and immeasurable amounts of blood, sweat and tears to producing the show each year. For the first time in weeks, they can go about their regular lives and maybe even get a little rest.

    This event is such an iconic element of Shelby County, a celebration of its history and its residents, and we appreciate those who give so much to benefit so many.

  • WHAT WE THINK: We hope other police agencies can follow Simpsonville

    Our county’s smallest police department is leading the way in safety.

    For more than a year now the Simpsonville Police Department has outfitted its officers with body cameras, providing a safety measure that not only helps protect the public, but the officers, as well.

    While they do come with a bit of a Big-Brother-is-watching feeling, having each interaction with an officer recorded is something that should make us all feel safer – on both sides of the badge.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Where are Sen. McConnell’s less expensive schools?

    Shelby County received a rare treat last week with a visit from Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Louisville).

    McConnell has a long history with Shelby County, including having his parents live here later in their lives.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: A masterful move

    This weekend 14 brilliant and dedicated chess experts and masters descended on Shelbyville for a tournament, and while it didn’t draw the crowds – and they likely wouldn’t want the noise – of a Collins or Shelby County high school football game we were glad to see a less noticeable sport rearing its head in our county.

    While we are all for our usual competition of baseball, softball, basketball, football and the like, we were excited to hear that some are trying to provide new opportunities for our residents.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Taking time to learn from our past

    On today’s front page we wrap up our annual Crime series that focuses on our important issues from violent crime to drug use and finally to traffic issues that include fender-benders and fatalities.

    It’s important that we look over this each year so we know where we stand, and where we as a community need to improve.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: Our taxing entities remain consistent

    This week we see the final two local government entities have hearings to set the property tax rates for 2016, and what we’re seeing is very exciting.

    All four entities refrained from raising taxes as we are finally seeing our local economy making a rebound.

    This is the third straight year we’ve seen no increases, and even the second year in a row we have watched as one entity, Simpsonville City Commission, has lowered its tax rate due to its vast commercial growth.

  • WHAT WE THINK: With issues identified it’s time to find solutions

    Last week we attended a meeting put together by the Shelby County Community Foundation and Metro United Way and we must say we were pleased and surprised.

    Pleased because assessing the needs of a community is not only a massive undertaking it is also a somewhat thankless job.

    As Leon Mooneyhan, CEO of the Ohio Valley Education Cooperative and member of both the SCCF and Shelbyville Metro United Way boards, put it, ““The expectation isn’t that this is all of the needs, but it’s a significant start.”

  • WE CONGRATULATE: The growth of Martinsville’s celebration

    One year ago, as we all came back to work fresh off a three-day holiday weekend one of our community’s was in mourning.

    A shooting in Martinsville, on the heels of the neighborhood’s annual Labor Day events, left many in shock and awe that such an event would happen as the day’s festivities had just wound down.

    At that point it would have been easy for the residents to pack up their parade and get together. They could have used the shooting as a reason to give up on the long established Shelbyville neighborhood.

  • WHAT WE THINK: SCPS drug-testing program will help students make the right decisions

    As Shelby County Public Schools adapts and changes for the future, we are seeing many changes.

    The district is constantly revamping and updating items to better equip our students with the tools they will need to be successful in an ever-changing world.

    Next week the district will deliver new computers for freshman through seniors at Collins and Shelby County high schools, along with students at Cropper.

    This new initiative will help our students learn to use technology as it is further integrated into the curriculum through each of the courses.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: Our community’s efforts to remain tight-knit

    We have long pegged Shelby County as a tight-knit community, but we must admit each fall we are amazed at the number of festivals celebrated in our communities and at the number of people that show for each one.

    In September and in to October area residents could spend every Saturday at a free event with their friends, family and neighbors and never have to leave the county.

    From Simpsonville to Bagdad and Finchville to Southville, there is something for everyone, everywhere.