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Editorials

  • A piece of history at an historical place

     

    When you have a special celebration, don’t you like to do something unique and make some personal history? There’s nothing like putting a red-lettered date in neon and setting a bar that you may not reach again, is there?

  • What we think: This amendment should be shot down

    On Nov. 6, among the many important decisions voters will be asked to make is one that they should not make: to pass an amendment to the state constitution that establishes hunting and fishing as legacy activities in the state.

    That is shorthand language for the Personal Right to Hunt and Fish Amendment, which was placed on the ballot by a quick and somewhat quietly authored House Bill 1 that passed the legislature earlier this year and became part of the election process without so much as a peep from the legislature.

  • We congratulate: SCOPE adds value to election process

    The election process would not be the same in Shelby County without the commitment of the leadership of the Shelby County Organized for Preservation and Enhancement – or SCOPE – and that organization’s commitment to this process.

    Once again this year, SCOPE organized and sponsored with The Sentinel-News the annual Candidate Forum. This has been happening every two years since 1988, and it is an established part of the election calendar.

  • What we think: Old Shelby murder case needs new look

    Did Susan King of Mount Eden murder her former boyfriend Kyle “Deanie” Breeden of Shelbyville in 1998?

    That question, which for years haunted investigators and Mr. Breeden’s family, was thought to be at rest in 2008, when Ms. King was sent to prison.

    But now we have our own new set of questions about this case, including not only how the investigation has been handled but also who has a responsibility to ensure that Ms. King in fact did commit this crime.

  • What we think: Shelby County should guard against narrow roads

    We have a suggestion for Carl Henry, the new czar of parking in Shelby County.

    Mr. Henry, whose title actually is the county’s road supervisor, was given by Shelby County Fiscal Court the right to set parking regulations on all streets and roads under the county’s jurisdiction.

  • We congratulate: Voter registration growth, but don't stop there

    We were pleased to learn recently that the number of registered voters in Shelby County has increased since we last elected a president.

    That’s always encouraging, and because as our populace grows, we need those of age to do their constitutional – and moral – duty by becoming involved in the electorate process.

    The number of adults in Shelby County who have filed their paperwork to vote in this election is nearly 28,000, which is a strong percentage of those who are eligible.

    That’s the good news, but it also is not enough.

  • What we think: Take this as a signal: No lights on bypass

    We are if nothing else consistent in our efforts to provide encouragement and guidance for the people who build and manage the roads in our county, and we’re not planning to stop.

    And we feel that when the state Transportation Cabinet isn’t asking, that’s when engineers and officials are in the greatest need of our advice. So here’s today’s suggestion: Forget about placing more traffic signals on the Shelbyville Bypass.

  • We congratulate: Nominated teachers are winners already

    Two more Shelby Countians are being considered among the very best at what they do in the state, and we like that.

    Sloane Barnett and Jennifer Cox are two of the 24 men and women statewide being considered for the honor of the state’s Teacher of the Year and moving on to national competition.

    Ms. Barnett, who teaches at Simpsonville Elementary, will vie with seven others for the top honor among elementary teachers. Ms. Cox, who teachers language arts at East Middle School, faces the same field among middle school instructors.

  • What we think: We don’t like Homecoming match

    On Friday night at Collins High School’s newly reopened turf field, the Titans will play host to rival Shelby County High School for the second time in their three years of existence.

    The first two games between these two have not been close, but this one looks on paper like it might be a real battle, indicative of a balancing of the playing field and the emergence of a true – if not simply geographic – rivalry. This should be a spectacle and a lot of fun for everyone.

    Except for one thing:

  • We congratulate: School board’s look at grades

    The Shelby County School Board has taken lot of constructive criticism recently about its actions relative to the tax assessments for this fiscal year. Some residents are asking hard questions about the decisions and the processes related to those assessments, and we will be watching this commentary unfold as it relates to the elections for the seats in three districts –  two contested –  this November.