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Editorials

  • WHAT WE THINK: It’s time to extend Discovery Boulevard

    The somewhat scary but mostly frustrating situation that evolved on Monday at Collins High School – when the school received a “security breach” that ultimately earned the students an extra day before end-of-school tests and an early ride home – brought to light an issue that we have feared could be key as the school became settled in its location and routine.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: The honoring of our musicical legacy

    Some remarkably talented and inspirational people will get a wonderful compliment this weekend, when former students of Ernie Threlkeld, Susie Saunders and Mel Owen will play a jazz concert in tribute to these fabulous music teachers, who passed away in recent years.

  • WHAT WE THINK: We fear another piece of Shelbyville history is lost

    We get ourselves worked up about topics of important public debate, but when reality reaches out and slaps our cheek with the sting of the fragility of our very core, we can’t help but feel a big tear rolling down our public face.

    That’s because today we can almost see through downtown Shelbyville, its center, decimated in March by the tragic and awful fire that consumed three buildings, again struck by a fire that on Sunday beheaded the beautiful and marvelous old Chatham House on the 600 block of Washington Street.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: Our man riding in Derby No. 139

    We are so pleased that Shelby County again will have a face in the Kentucky Derby.

    Jockey Jon Court is back for his second ride in three years – after decades of having been left off the backs of the 20 3-year-olds entered each year – and we think that’s a sure bet for everyone.

    It’s not so much like in football or basketball or even golf, when the athlete’s hometown gets a mention on national TV, but it’s just such a magnet for additional community pride.

  • WHAT WE THINK: This is a decision that really smells

    The Shelby County Fiscal Court Legislative Committee’s plan to “step away” from creating curbside garbage and recycling for residents should be trashed.

    This is no time to step away from doing what is right, and there is no mitigating argument that will sway our belief that Shelby Countians should be able to discard trash and recyclables without having to drive somewhere or pay a third party to do so.

  • WHAT WE THINK: There is a the true mission for Shelby County's curbside garbage plan

    With two important meetings this week among officials trying to develop curbside garbage pickup in Shelby County, the mission statement for this project has emerged from the man whose public meetings gave this concept momentum.

    That would be Rusty Newton, chair of the 109 Board, the entity that is in charge of solid-waste pickup in the county. This is what Mr. Newton told officials last week when they gathered to discuss a joint contract between the Shelbyville City Council and Shelby County Fiscal Court:

  • WE CONGRATULATE: Antonita Slaughter’s Final 4 performance

    Wasn’t it nice to see a face from Shelbyville playing under the glaring spotlight of the NCAA Tournament’s Final 4?
    We speak, of course, about Antonita Slaughter, the latest of the talented Slaughters from Shelbyville, who spearheaded the University of Louisville to the women’s Final 4 and thus became the first woman from Shelby County to play in that event.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: A legacy of art in Shelbyville

    A key person in the development of the arts in Shelby County has put away her paints and brushes – at least commercially – and we’re sad to see her go.

    Linda Powell made some of the first strokes on the blank easel that became Shelby Artists on Main and then the Gallery at the same consortium, which operates out of 617 Main Street in Shelbyville.

  • WHAT WE THINK: The postal story grows ever sadder

    There seems no simple solution to the economic conundrum that is the United States Postal Service. As a result, sadly, citizens who use community post offices are finding that opportunity to be diminishing on a gradual but steepening incline toward what many would consider to be oblivion.

  • WHAT WE THINK: We are offended by sex registry

    We were troubled last week to learn that a broad-based sweep to ensure that registered sex offenders were complying with lifetime restrictions had turned up a sex offender on the loose in Shelby County.

    But that disgusting news – to us, any sex offender loose in our neighborhoods is a potential threat to our children – was surpassed when we learned of a Shelbyville man arrested virtually the same day on child sex charges was not even a part of the registry or a target in the sweep.