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Editorials

  • WHAT WE THINK: It’s time to extend Discovery Boulevard

    The somewhat scary but mostly frustrating situation that evolved on Monday at Collins High School – when the school received a “security breach” that ultimately earned the students an extra day before end-of-school tests and an early ride home – brought to light an issue that we have feared could be key as the school became settled in its location and routine.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: The honoring of our musicical legacy

    Some remarkably talented and inspirational people will get a wonderful compliment this weekend, when former students of Ernie Threlkeld, Susie Saunders and Mel Owen will play a jazz concert in tribute to these fabulous music teachers, who passed away in recent years.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: Our man riding in Derby No. 139

    We are so pleased that Shelby County again will have a face in the Kentucky Derby.

    Jockey Jon Court is back for his second ride in three years – after decades of having been left off the backs of the 20 3-year-olds entered each year – and we think that’s a sure bet for everyone.

    It’s not so much like in football or basketball or even golf, when the athlete’s hometown gets a mention on national TV, but it’s just such a magnet for additional community pride.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: Antonita Slaughter’s Final 4 performance

    Wasn’t it nice to see a face from Shelbyville playing under the glaring spotlight of the NCAA Tournament’s Final 4?
    We speak, of course, about Antonita Slaughter, the latest of the talented Slaughters from Shelbyville, who spearheaded the University of Louisville to the women’s Final 4 and thus became the first woman from Shelby County to play in that event.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: A legacy of art in Shelbyville

    A key person in the development of the arts in Shelby County has put away her paints and brushes – at least commercially – and we’re sad to see her go.

    Linda Powell made some of the first strokes on the blank easel that became Shelby Artists on Main and then the Gallery at the same consortium, which operates out of 617 Main Street in Shelbyville.

  • WHAT WE THINK: The postal story grows ever sadder

    There seems no simple solution to the economic conundrum that is the United States Postal Service. As a result, sadly, citizens who use community post offices are finding that opportunity to be diminishing on a gradual but steepening incline toward what many would consider to be oblivion.

  • WHAT WE THINK: We are offended by sex registry

    We were troubled last week to learn that a broad-based sweep to ensure that registered sex offenders were complying with lifetime restrictions had turned up a sex offender on the loose in Shelby County.

    But that disgusting news – to us, any sex offender loose in our neighborhoods is a potential threat to our children – was surpassed when we learned of a Shelbyville man arrested virtually the same day on child sex charges was not even a part of the registry or a target in the sweep.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: A new idea for helping all

    We don’t mean to endorse one religion over another – in fact, we wouldn’t dare – but we have to give the Methodists their props for what we consider a very good idea.

    That was the organized community effort the Methodist churches in the county convened last Saturday to help those who most need help.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: Mr. Reynolds’ plans for a new neighborhood

    Jim Reynolds, the man whose three buildings were destroyed in the fire in Shelbyville three weeks ago, has wasted no time in planning to replace those buildings, and we wish him Godspeed in that endeavor.

    Mr. Reynolds, who expressed tearful devastation in watching the buildings burn and then seeing them swept away into a line of Dumpsters, has been moving around Shelbyville in the past week, not only discussing his ideas but sharing with Historic District Coordinator Fred Rogers sketches of his actual plans, concepts of which Mr. Rogers spoke effusively and hopefully.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Another unnecessary law from Frankfort

    The issue of guaranteeing religious freedom emerged this month in a bill that sailed through the General Assembly and was vetoed last week by Gov. Steve Beshear.

    We certainly are proponents of religious freedom and supporters of those rights as enumerated in the U.S. and state constitutions, but to us this seems sort of like the below-the-radar constitutional amendment on hunting that the voters swallowed last November:

    Why are our elected leaders spending time on something esoteric and unnecessary?