• WHAT WE THINK: Clouds gather in Frankfort for Sunshine Week

    Here we are, right smack dab in the middle of National Sunshine Week, and the Kentucky Legislature is as cloudy as the weather.
    Sunshine Week, March 11-17, celebrates transparency in government and promotes Sunshine Laws in place so citizens can know what their government is doing by highlighting the importance of open records, meetings and freedom of information.
    The same day the Kentucky House of Representatives recognized House Resolution 220, in honor of Sunshine Week, House Bill 200 was received in the Senate Committee of Appropriations and Revenue.

  • WHAT WE THINK: A Merry Christmas and a bustling New Year

    While shoppers have been scouring Main Street and the outlet mall for the perfect gifts, Shelby County has been scrambling to close the year with a boom.

    Just this month we’ll have discussion of a new proposed distillery along Interstate 64 in Waddy, the Shelby County Board of Education is looking into the purchase of the Jefferson Community and Technical Shelby Campus, and Main Street in Shelbyville is bursting with new opportunities.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Trial sparks intrigue, excitement for a 2nd time

    About 80 years ago Shelby County, along with the nation and the world, stopped to watch the court proceedings on Main Street in Shelbyville.

    The Garr brothers were standing trial for the alleged murder of Brig. Gen. Henry Denhardt, and everyone waited to see the verdict of what appeared to be revenge for the alleged murder of the Garr’s sister, Verna.

    And back in the Shelby County Courthouse this weekend, visitors watched the trial unfold again.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Celebration is about more than just lights

    Thousands roamed the street in Shelbyville Saturday, waiting to bask in the glow.

    The city’s annual Celebration of Lights culminated with the pop of the holiday season’s red, green, orange and blue bulbs.

    Downtown Shelbyville is now awash in color and Simpsonville will soon join this weekend, marking Shelby County as one of the first communities in the state to dive head first into the holidays.

  • GUEST EDITORIAL, Matthew Paxton IV: Slow mail costs money

    Most people get mail every day, Monday through Saturday. But what happens when the mail comes later than we expect?

    We found out a few years ago, when the Postmaster General had to take away overnight First-Class and Periodicals mail from most of the nation. That caused a problem for a lot of consumers and businesses. Now we may be facing a new slowdown, if Congress doesn’t do something very soon.

    Who needs the mail, some people ask? We have the Internet now.

  • WHAT WE THINK: A total eclipse of our day

    Well that was fun!

    The build up was immense, the hype beyond anything even the sporting world could produce.

    But the solar eclipse lived up to its billing as one of the greatest celestial shows on earth.

    Maybe Shelby County wasn’t in the path of totality and maybe it’s didn’t get dark enough to fool our bats into coming out and our chickens into going in to roost.

    It turns out about 5 percent of the sun is still a lot of light.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Water tower removal is a sign of growth

    Facebook has been flooded recently with people taking photos of and waxing poetic about the old water tower in downtown Shelbyville.

    As crews started working on taking it down over the weekend – and work will continue this weekend – we heard more and more people lament its removal.

    We, too, were sad to see it go, but changes are necessary.

    Water company manager Tom Doyle said last week that it would cost more than $300,000 just to bring it up to current safety standards.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Horse show brings out the best in Shelby

    It hardly seems like the middle of July, especially with temperatures hovering in the mid-80s this week.

    But here we are, back in school and post Shelbyville Horse Show.

    Last week we talked about how our state legislatures should not try to legislate how or when schools districts start the new year.

    One reason they proposed a later year was for tourism revenue.

    Shelby County Public Schools started this year earlier than it has in the past several years, but our Shelbyville Horse Show continued to thrive.

  • GUEST EDITORIAL, State Sen. Damon Thayer: Bill could change school dates for 2018-19

    As we turn the page on July 2017, I find myself asking the same question once again, “Is summer over already?”

  • WHAT WE THINK: Senate Bill 50’s best mark leaves decision to local boards

    Smiling students – or at least half awake students – boarded buses and piled out of cars this morning for the first day of school after a long and restful summer break.

    And while it may seem very early to be back in school, we must remember that they’ve been out since well before June 1, and there are three two-week breaks coming this school year – one in October, another in December and again in April.