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Editorials

  • WHAT WE THINK: Wet/dry vote is a principle of economics

     The Shelby County Fiscal Court’s decision to take on the work to let the people vote on the county’s wet/dry/moist status should be met with great applause.

    The idea of allowing package liquor sales in the county is not a new one, but this is the first time the county has lent its full support to the cause.

    Last week the court approved setting aside $15,000 to help attain the signatures needed to get the decision put on the ballot.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Post-secondary education cuts go too deep

    At what point do we realize that we have already cut to the quick in education?

    The bleeding will not stop, and the newest band-aid will likely need to be applied on our community college system.

    Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed budget calls for spending cut of 4.5 percent for postsecondary education institutions for the remainder of this fiscal year followed by a whopping 9 percent cut included in budget.

  • WHAT WE THINK: It's time for community to address heroin

    For the past several months a small Southern Indiana community has been a part of the national news because of an HIV epidemic.

    Scott County, Ind., has a little more than half the population of Shelby County, and Scottsburg, the county seat, is a little less than half the size of Shelbyville.

    In Scott County the leading issue has been Opana, an opiod used for severe pain.

    Users will melt the pills to shoot up for a quicker, more intense high.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Simpsonville gearing up for Internet expansion

    While the Simpsonville City Commission handles the day-to-day issues of the city, it’s shown time and time again that it has at least one eye focused squarely on the future.

    And that has never been more evident than at Thursday’s meeting.

    City commissioners, Mayor Steve Eden and staff discussed the budget, salt for the roads for this week’s winter weather, road projects and hiring an attorney to help with the possible addition of a high speed Internet franchise agreement.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Vacant dealership is an entry eyesore

    More than six months ago Shelby County lost one of its major auto dealers when the Jeff Wyler Group closed the doors on its Chevrolet Buick GMC dealership on the west end of Shelbyville.

    Located on Taylorsville Road the site had long since been an auto dealer, welcoming patrons into Shelbyville on one of our busiest roads.

    Now the lot still sits empty, begging for another dealership to meet our needs.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Mt. Eden Road development a step in the right direction

    We are happy to see two new developments planned for the east side of Shelbyville on Mount Eden Road.

    As a main entrance to our county seat, our zoning commission has approved a solid plan for those looking to build here, and we believe some expansion on the east side is certainly warranted.

    Although more would be needed to create a perfect balance between the east and west sides of the city, and even the county, we see this as a solid start.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Dividing up the tourism tax so we all get a bite

    On Jan. 1, the city of Shelbyville’s tourism tax kicked in, meaning an extra 3 percent tax has been added to restaurants, lunch counters and certain items from grocery and convenient stores.

    Now that it is in place, we can stop the discussion about whether we want the new tax or if it is warranted, and instead focus on where the money can be spent.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Season's first snow is no match

    It took almost three more months than last winter, but we finally got our first snow of the season over the weekend.

    And while roads in other counties struggled, Interstate 64 and the roads around Shelby County appeared clear and easy to navigate.

    The same could be said for Monday’s short but impressive snow shower.

    For that we commend our city, county and state road crews for their long hours, preparation and commitment to our safety.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Our goals for 2016

    Having looked back at our successful 2015, it’s time to look forward to 2016 and how we want to see our community continue to grow and take its shape for the future.

    What do we want our county and our community to look like for 2016, where are our priorities?

    We want to be ambitious while remaining realistic. We want to address issues that have captivated the public and we want answers.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Looking back on 2015

    Every January since 2009 The Sentinel-News has established a blueprint for the coming year to help focus on ideas, concepts and circumstances that deserve – or require – our attention.