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Editorials

  • WHAT WE THINK: Water tower removal is a sign of growth

    Facebook has been flooded recently with people taking photos of and waxing poetic about the old water tower in downtown Shelbyville.

    As crews started working on taking it down over the weekend – and work will continue this weekend – we heard more and more people lament its removal.

    We, too, were sad to see it go, but changes are necessary.

    Water company manager Tom Doyle said last week that it would cost more than $300,000 just to bring it up to current safety standards.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Horse show brings out the best in Shelby

    It hardly seems like the middle of July, especially with temperatures hovering in the mid-80s this week.

    But here we are, back in school and post Shelbyville Horse Show.

    Last week we talked about how our state legislatures should not try to legislate how or when schools districts start the new year.

    One reason they proposed a later year was for tourism revenue.

    Shelby County Public Schools started this year earlier than it has in the past several years, but our Shelbyville Horse Show continued to thrive.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Senate Bill 50’s best mark leaves decision to local boards

    Smiling students – or at least half awake students – boarded buses and piled out of cars this morning for the first day of school after a long and restful summer break.

    And while it may seem very early to be back in school, we must remember that they’ve been out since well before June 1, and there are three two-week breaks coming this school year – one in October, another in December and again in April.

  • GUEST EDITORIAL, State Sen. Damon Thayer: Bill could change school dates for 2018-19

    As we turn the page on July 2017, I find myself asking the same question once again, “Is summer over already?”

  • WHAT WE THINK: Remove the politics from our local election

    The Shelbyville City Council decided last week to draft an ordinance for review on making the council race a non-partisan affair.

    Having long wondered what Republican and Democrats have to do with our small town politics, we could not be more pleased and more behind this effort.

    And once information was shared comparing other municipalities, especially those similar to Shelbyville, it seems the move is a no-brainer.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Looking back on 2016

    Every January since 2009 The Sentinel-News has established a blueprint for the coming year to help focus on ideas, concepts and circumstances that deserve – or require – our attention.

    Every year since 2010, we have issued a report card to review how well the community has responded to those goals. Sometimes new issues rush in and steal our momentum – like our unplanned but huge response to a growing heroin issue – but generally we have at the end of the year developed a grade for how we have fared as a community.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: The Moores on 3 decades of service

    For more than 30 years Glenn and Dennis Moore have been servicing Shelby County.

    Now ready to take some time off, the Moores are planning to put their feet and rest a while, a well-deserved rest too.

    And while their decision to retire and close the shop is a loss for the driving public of Shelby County, we still marvel at the time they put in making sure our cars were running and safe.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Court’s alcohol ordinance, addition of Sunday sales

    We were pleased to see the Shelby County Fiscal Court move forward last week and pass an alcohol ordinance that included Sunday package sales.

    The court saw the ability to expand our services while upholding the will of the people after residents in Shelby County overwhelmingly voted to make the county wet earlier this year.

    Now, just because we are in favor of the new expanded alcohol sales and adding them on Sunday doesn’t mean we want to see a liquor store on every corner… and we won’t.

  • WHAT WE THINK: For holiday cheer, try just being polite

    Over the last several decades Black Friday has been known to bring out the worst in people.

    We’ve all seen it – shoppers trampled, pushed, shoved, cursed at and fighting over a cheap TV or the must-have holiday toy of the season.

    It’s the saddest display of what a consumer driven society can do to people.

    And while shoppers can be difficult to deal with throughout the holiday season, one troubling trend we’ve seen across the commonwealth, and even nationwide, is the rudeness going both ways.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Sunday sales needed to help serve distilleries

    If the Shelbyville City Council has the opportunity to help a local business succeed and no other businesses or individuals would be harmed or displaced because of it, should it not take that option?

    That obvious answer to that question is yes, especially when they annexed and helped put laws in place for that business so it could get started.

    But the council seems to have mixed feelings on helping Jeptha Creed Distillery be able to reach its full potential.