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Columns

  • A salute of honor from a non-vet of Veterans Day

    Veterans Day took on a new meaning for me a few years ago.

    As a child of the Vietnam Era, I admired and feared for those who took up arms for our country, but being a timid little country boy, I shamefully admit that I wasn’t real keen on participating.

    Perhaps admiration and guilt combine to form my odd interest in fiction and films about World War II, maybe they are  why I’ve read The Winds of War/War & Remembrance six times and watched the miniseries of the latter nearly that many times.

  • EARLIER: A whole new perspective on Veteran's Day

    It almost is embarrassing me to admit that for most of my life Veteran’s Day has been more of an amorphous interruption of the mail and bank schedules that I had to endure than any sort of sanctioned holiday.

    School was in session, and there was no paid respite from work. Veteran’s Day was just sort of there, a poor, red-numbered step holiday to its more famous cousin in May, Memorial Day.

  • The impact of 9-11: Something really good did emerge

    This is the week for one of those winding, emotional and reflective cruises down the turbulent tributaries that feed those endless eddies stirred by a life-changing event.

    We don’t simply glance over our shoulders at the rapids that changed our course, but we stare at it, consume it anew and bring from our deep-sealed memories the emotions, the adrenalin that carried us through those waters to our anchorage of today.

  • DOYLE: How do you leave all of this?

    The room was filled with some 500 years worth of friendships and maybe 600 more of family years.

    Think about it: I was in a room with people I had known collectively for more than a thousand years.

    Methuselah didn’t live that long, and I know he didn’t have friends that were as loyal or as wonderful as these.

    We were in the living room at Dozen Acres Farm. The sun was shining, and spring seemed possible, if not eternal. We were loving and being loved.

  • Adjust your retirement funds with age

    First, here are two corrections for the column that appeared in the Nov. 26th edition of this paper. In paragraph two of the review of Kate Balchelder’s Wall Street Journal editorial I wrote total spending in 2009 was $3.5 million. That should read $3.5 TRILLION. The second misquote is in the third paragraph. Instead of $30 Billion it should have said $30 MILLLION.

    Sorry about that.

    Let’s talk about pensions: yours and mine and how we differ from the various levels of governments.

  • Poor pollination can hold back corn crop

    Small stalks, small ears, poor kernel development… does this describe your corn crop this year? Or maybe the raccoons absconded with the crop!

    If this sounds like you there may be several factors at work. Drought at the wrong time can stunt your corn crop and cold damage can stunt corn. If you put your crop out early you could see a little stunting from a late spring cold snap. And poor drainage and poor soil fertility, especially nitrogen, can stunt the crop as well.

  • SOUDER: A wake-up call for good men (and women)

    I have a confession to make: I am tired. Specifically, I am tired of lies masquerading as truth. I am tired of darkness being called light. I am tired of supposedly smart people saying incredibly stupid and demonstrably false things and no one calling them out on it. I am tired of the revisionist history that tries to erase the influence that Christianity had on our nation’s founding.

  • CHARLTON: Is atheism truly what we think it is?

    Who gets to decide when another person is or isn’t an atheist?

    Oprah Winfrey has ignited a bit of controversy over this question in a recent interview with long distance swimmer Diana Nyad. Winfrey interviewed Nyad on Oct. 13 as a part of her Super Soul Sunday. During the interview Nyad remarked that she is an atheist, which sparked an interesting exchange, the highlights of which are as follows:

    Winfrey (in response to Nyad’s statement of being an atheist: “But you’re in awe [of nature].”

  • SOUDER: The folly of campaign promises – and those who believe them

    I ran across the following fictional account some time ago, and though the point it makes can be applied at any time, it seemed especially appropriate now. Here is the story:

    While walking down the street one day, a corrupt senator (sorry for the near redundancy) is tragically hit by a car and dies. His soul arrives in heaven and is met by St. Peter at the entrance.

  • CHARLTON: An example that the wrong people get most attention

    Sometimes, it’s what doesn’t make the news that is most newsworthy, and conversely, what makes the news that is the most inconsequential.

    Take, for instance, the amount of attention given to Miley Cyrus. Not that I seek to offer her any more notoriety, but are her exploits really deserving of so much attention? I think not, mostly because that is the intended purpose – to draw attention and keep her in the eye of the media.