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Columns

  • SOUDER: Nobody’s perfect
  • The day the world stopped

    In the middle of a Friday afternoon in November a sixth-grade student came bursting through the gymnasium doors at Simpsonville Elementary and moved quickly to speak to our teacher, who was standing in front of the stage and watching us play basketball or generally run That someone came into the gym distracted us to a point of pause, because it was so out of the ordinary, but what happened after that let us know why the extraordinary was in order, even if for a while we didn’t understand truly.

  • A writer’s truest benchmark

    More than 20 years ago, a friend handed me a paperback and told me that it would be the most amazing thing I ever had encountered.

  • CHARLTON: Be careful about bowing to prayer issue

    Once again, prayer has found its way to the U. S. Supreme Court.

    On Wednesday of this week the Supreme Court heard arguments in the case Town of Greece, New York v. Susan Galloway, Et. Al. The case began when two citizens of Greece, N.Y., objected to the practice of clergy – primarily Christian clergy – offering prayers at the beginning of monthly city council meetings. They filed suit against the city, seeking to stop the practice of prayers before the meetings, and the case is now in the hands of the Supreme Court.

  • SOUDER: A wake-up call for good men (and women)

    I have a confession to make: I am tired. Specifically, I am tired of lies masquerading as truth. I am tired of darkness being called light. I am tired of supposedly smart people saying incredibly stupid and demonstrably false things and no one calling them out on it. I am tired of the revisionist history that tries to erase the influence that Christianity had on our nation’s founding.

  • Shelby County's most wonderful import from England

    We were maybe 7 years old when we first heard that elegant accent, something so foreign as to be indefinable to our uncultured, tone-deaf ears. All we knew was that this wasn’t the flat twang heard all around Shelby County, which in those days was dead to any sort sound of elsewhere.

    But those of us who hung around Simpsonville soon learned that the words and dialect of a friend’s mother were in fact the King’s English, perfected in the British Isles and brought to America to sing for us on just about any occasion.

  • Our Halloween frocks of froth

    Lesson No. 666,666 that I am becoming a curmudgeon: Halloween costumes.

    Have you been to a costume store this fall looking for the best way to deck out your little ones for the annual Halloween sugarfest?

  • CHARLTON: Is atheism truly what we think it is?

    Who gets to decide when another person is or isn’t an atheist?

    Oprah Winfrey has ignited a bit of controversy over this question in a recent interview with long distance swimmer Diana Nyad. Winfrey interviewed Nyad on Oct. 13 as a part of her Super Soul Sunday. During the interview Nyad remarked that she is an atheist, which sparked an interesting exchange, the highlights of which are as follows:

    Winfrey (in response to Nyad’s statement of being an atheist: “But you’re in awe [of nature].”

  • Filling a gap in our history

    When you visit historic sites – particularly those that dealt with the founding and discovery of our great nation – do you conjure what that place must have been like for the persons who first trod in your footprints? Have you wondered about the hardships they experienced, how they first encountered the vistas you so simply accessed?

  • SOUDER: The folly of campaign promises – and those who believe them

    I ran across the following fictional account some time ago, and though the point it makes can be applied at any time, it seemed especially appropriate now. Here is the story:

    While walking down the street one day, a corrupt senator (sorry for the near redundancy) is tragically hit by a car and dies. His soul arrives in heaven and is met by St. Peter at the entrance.