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Columns

  • Waiting to watch the NCAA Tournament games

    Last Thursday afternoon, when everyone from Fulton to Flatwoods was mesmerized with the bouncing of a basketball in one place or another, there were two people I know who did their best to avoid that madness that tends to grip us in March.
    That would be my wife and me.
    Yes, on Thursday, the geniuses who program the NCAA Tournament chose to have the University of Louisville play Morehead State at 1:45 p.m. and Kentucky to square off with Princeton about 45 minutes later.

  • SOUDER: The madness this March spreads beyond basketball

    Well, it’s March, so bring on the madness. This time of year means only one thing around here: basketball, basketball and more basketball.

    And though there isn’t as much local interest in the KHSAA Sweet 16 this year, NCAA Tournament fever is high. Regrettably, my “home team” – the Indiana Hoosiers – are sitting this one out (again), and I find myself sounding like a Chicago Cubs fan as I hopefully say, “Wait till next year!”

  • Surviving in the NCAA Tournament? That’s really not so difficult

    Today’s the day when we’re supposed to mourn the NCAA Basketball Tournament, aka Big East Invitational, and its myopically developed field and obtusely seeded brackets (for UK fans).

    And that would have been a worthy thing to do, to suggest that only the winners from last week’s conference tournaments should move forward, thus removing all the decision-making and golden parachutes for failing teams. Those points have merit.

    But does all that really matter so much?

  • We journalists may not be worth much, but we love what we do

    I was standing in a convenience store last week, next to a new and neat stack of The Sentinel-News that I had just delivered because the guy contracted to do so was sick.

    (Hey, nobody wants the paper to get out more than I do, so you do what needs to be done. To understand that, read on.)

    And while I was there, a guy walked up and took a paper off the top, for which I thanked him.

  • SOUDER: The Great Divide: Which side are you on?

    My daughter has a good friend who tells this joke: There are three kinds of people in the world – those who can count, and those who can’t. I’ve said it this way before: There are two kinds of people in the world – those who say there are two kinds of people and those who don’t.

  • How a guy terrified of tornadoes has found a scary new calm

    Maybe it’s a statement about complacency, laziness or just a bit of “the-sky-is-falling” syndrome – literally – that I didn’t leap to the computer or TV Monday morning when it felt like the side of my house was going to be sent blasting into Franklin County.

    Many of you were awake, alert and ever vigilant to your family’s safety, but all I did was lie there and hope that the siding would stay put and wonder if the dripping I heard was from the ceiling and not the gutter (neither happened).

  • Big night, big game, but location is big mistake

    To see the big show in town this week, you will have to drive to Taylorsville.

    And, nothing against our brethren to the south, but this seems the wrong direction for Shelby County’s new direction.

    In case you missed the news, for the first time since 1975, two high schools in Shelby County will meet Thursday night in a basketball tournament game, when Shelby County and Collins high schools collide in a 30th District Tournament semifinal.

  • SOUDER: Ours is a tenuous freedom – to be sure

    During the past couple of weeks, the whole world seemed to be watching the unfolding events in Egypt. Each night on television, or each morning in the newspapers, Americans watched as the protests began gaining momentum.

    As more and more people took to the streets of Cairo, many wondered if there would be violence and how what was going on there might affect the surrounding areas and even the rest of the world.

  • A couple of presidential presences worth celebrating

    On Monday we will celebrate the births of two of America’s most renown presidents: George Washington, who couldn’t screw up a job for which no one had any expectations, and Abraham Lincoln, who dared to allow a nation to screw itself up in order to set it on course to purge itself of crimes against mankind.

    Despite those who disagreed with their views, their tactics and even their legacies, these men are the icons against whom all subsequent presidents are measured.

  • A couple of presidential presences worth celebrating

    On Monday we will celebrate the births of two of America’s most renown presidents: George Washington, who couldn’t screw up a job for which no one had any expectations, and Abraham Lincoln, who dared to allow a nation to screw itself up in order to set it on course to purge itself of crimes against mankind.

    Despite those who disagreed with their views, their tactics and even their legacies, these men are the icons against whom all subsequent presidents are measured.