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Columns

  • A piece of fiction that makes you proud of the fact

    Maybe this happens in your profession or in some aspect of your life: a moment when you want to stand up before the world and say how proud you are of what you do.

    That’s how I feel today – oddly not because of some magnanimous piece of journalism but because of an hour or two of pure fiction.

  • SOUDER: The founders’ Declaration of ‘In-Dependence’

    Next week, as we celebrate the 4th of July, millions of Americans will have cookouts, go swimming, play cornhole and watch fireworks. A few of us actually will pause for a moment to reflect upon what the day is all about.

    As I’m sure you’re aware, the 4th of July is our national Independence Day, memorializing the day our Founding Fathers declared their independence from Great Britain.

  • Sometimes in life, you just have to cut it

    You may recall that recently our family moved from the suburbs to a small farm, that we have been going through a sort of a sociological withdrawal, somewhat of a remake of Green Acresfor the new millennium, minus Oliver Douglas’s suits and Lisa’s gowns, Hank Kimball and the pig.

  • A life may have ended, but a legacy continue

    There is a sesne today that I shouldn’t be here. I should be in the suburbs of Denver, helping to lay to rest a man who in many ways made me whatever success I have been in this world, a man I call friend.
    Just a week ago, Tom Patterson lay quietly in an ICU in California, tubes and machines breathing for him. Breathing long had been Tom’s downfall, brought on by a 15-year battle with a lung-eating disease called scleroderma.

  • SOUDER: Father’s Day is just like Mother’s Day, except smaller presents

    As I hope you are aware, this Sunday is Father’s Day. For whatever reason, as the title of today’s column suggests, Father’s Day seems to play second fiddle to Mother’s Day.

    Perhaps it is because, in many instances, moms play a bigger role in the child-rearing process. I once read an article describing differences between moms and dads, and one of the areas it highlighted was the knowledge about their children.

  • A tradition like no other

    They lounged beneath awnings that were erected under a shade tree in the front yard and at tables, chairs, benches and even a swing spaced along an L-shaped front porch. They squeezed into folding chairs at tables, found occasional seats along walls, surrounded card tables pushed together in the family room and even stood and sat in spots around the perimeter of the kitchen and on playground equipment in the back yard.

  • Someday, graduates will find yesterday as important as tomorrow

    Most of the roughly 450 students who this week graduated from high schools in Shelby County – and in recent weeks peer institutions from around the world – likely perceive the passing of those diplomas as the metaphorical transformation from a 13-year trek through classrooms and textbooks to a lifetime of awesome and inspiring adventure.

  • SOUDER: Words without meanings form our ‘divide’

    In a column in March of last year, I wrote about what I called “the great divide” in our country, and things certainly haven’t changed since then. If anything, this divide has become more obvious and recognizable.

  • They play a new and different game on old field of dreams

    The line drive whistled off the pink bat toward third base, where it scattered the dust when it landed untouched by a fielder. The batter took off toward first base, where a coach was encouraging a runner already there to move along toward second.

    The little hitter stopped at first, and as each successive hitter made contact and followed her, she kept shuttling around the bases, until, after she crossed home, she headed back to first base, where she was detoured by the coach and told she could sit down.

  • On the other side of the questions

    During the past couple of weeks, I have found myself standing before several of you talking about what we do and how we try to do it.
    And, as I tell any group to which I speak, I make my living by typing, not talking. That was a decision I made in college, when I realized that my flat Kentucky twang and wild blonde hair did not translate smoothly on television, thus ending my dream of being the next Cawood Ledford – with hair – which was after I realized pro sports were out, too.