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Columns

  • This is a 200th birthday for the soul

    In 1812, on a couple of acres of northwestern Shelby County, members of Dover Baptist Church first assembled and discussed heavenly guidance in the prairies of what was then the nation’s western environs. Kentucky was only 20 years a state, and the congregation surely must have prayed for divine intervention in its growth and the safety of its settlers.

    This Sunday, that 200th birthday will be celebrated at Dover, and a lot of folks I know will be there – most notably, I predict, the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost. They are always there.

  • Is there any way to make sense of all that killing?

    A guy buys weapons that Marines typically use. He stockpiles more ammo than the National Guard Armory. He applies his advanced intellect to build a lethal mousetrap in the apartment building where he lives.

    Then he dons armor and opens fire with as semi-automatic assault rifle, killing a dozen people and almost 58 more who are sitting calmly and happily watching the latest episode of Batman at a big-screen movie complex.

    That would seem more like a movie plot within a plot, wouldn’t it?

  • Shelby will have its day in new basketball hall-of-fame

    Here’s what I heard a man saying on talk radio this morning. He was talking about the new high school basketball hall of fame that is being constructed in Elizabethtown. He was moaning – my word – about how Fairdale High School had no one in the first induction class.

    He spoke about how the school dominated boys basketball during the late 1980s and ‘90s – which it did – and then he said,  “We had two or three guys who went on to play Division I. We should have someone in there.”

  • SOUDER: Going up or going down?

    No doubt you have had the experience of standing outside an elevator and had someone ask you, “Going up?” or conversely, “Going down?” The point of the question, obviously, is to give you an opportunity to get on that particular elevator if it is going the direction in which you wish to go.

    It is always important to know which way an elevator is going (and which way you want to go on it), but an even more important question to consider is this: As a society, are we going up or going down?

  • A piece of fiction that makes you proud of the fact

    Maybe this happens in your profession or in some aspect of your life: a moment when you want to stand up before the world and say how proud you are of what you do.

    That’s how I feel today – oddly not because of some magnanimous piece of journalism but because of an hour or two of pure fiction.

  • SOUDER: The founders’ Declaration of ‘In-Dependence’

    Next week, as we celebrate the 4th of July, millions of Americans will have cookouts, go swimming, play cornhole and watch fireworks. A few of us actually will pause for a moment to reflect upon what the day is all about.

    As I’m sure you’re aware, the 4th of July is our national Independence Day, memorializing the day our Founding Fathers declared their independence from Great Britain.

  • Sometimes in life, you just have to cut it

    You may recall that recently our family moved from the suburbs to a small farm, that we have been going through a sort of a sociological withdrawal, somewhat of a remake of Green Acresfor the new millennium, minus Oliver Douglas’s suits and Lisa’s gowns, Hank Kimball and the pig.

  • A life may have ended, but a legacy continue

    There is a sesne today that I shouldn’t be here. I should be in the suburbs of Denver, helping to lay to rest a man who in many ways made me whatever success I have been in this world, a man I call friend.
    Just a week ago, Tom Patterson lay quietly in an ICU in California, tubes and machines breathing for him. Breathing long had been Tom’s downfall, brought on by a 15-year battle with a lung-eating disease called scleroderma.

  • SOUDER: Father’s Day is just like Mother’s Day, except smaller presents

    As I hope you are aware, this Sunday is Father’s Day. For whatever reason, as the title of today’s column suggests, Father’s Day seems to play second fiddle to Mother’s Day.

    Perhaps it is because, in many instances, moms play a bigger role in the child-rearing process. I once read an article describing differences between moms and dads, and one of the areas it highlighted was the knowledge about their children.

  • A tradition like no other

    They lounged beneath awnings that were erected under a shade tree in the front yard and at tables, chairs, benches and even a swing spaced along an L-shaped front porch. They squeezed into folding chairs at tables, found occasional seats along walls, surrounded card tables pushed together in the family room and even stood and sat in spots around the perimeter of the kitchen and on playground equipment in the back yard.