• Despite the quiet, a roar will remain

    The scene has no great artistic value, other than to galvanize one fictional man’s words with a living man’s conviction.

    Humphrey Bogart. Ed Hutcheson in the film Deadline USA. Crusading editor for The Day. He’s taking down a mobster, seeking the truth against a cunning corruptor looking to control his city. Hutcheson is winning. He is telling the truth. He is gloating.

  • SOUDER: So many questions, so little time

    It may come as a surprise to some, but sometimes when I have periods of uninterrupted time – like on a long car trip, or lying in bed before falling asleep at night – I think about life’s big questions.

    You know, questions like, when a cow laughs, does milk come out his nose? Or why does sour cream have an expiration date? And why do feet smell, but noses run?

  • So just how sweet was winning the Sugar Bowl?

    A lot of you of both the red and blue heritage have been trying lately to put the University of Louisville’s stunning victory over Florida into some sort of perspective, to make sense of the sensational, to find order in a moment of chaos. I’m talking about the recent football game, not the Elite 8 encounter in basketball last spring.

  • A perfect first snowfall day to play

    Wasn’t that a lovely gift for Mother Nature to deliver our first real snowfall on a Saturday during a holiday break? No work for many, no school for any and no planned hootenanny.

    The snow wasn’t too deep, the temp wasn’t too cold and the landscape The Artist painted was one of great elegance, Christmas card-quality and pure whiteness. We can even forgive its arriving four days too late to give Santa safe landings.

    Ultimate beauty, moderate temperatures and mild disruption equal the perfect snowfall.

  • SOUDER: Looking for ‘whirled peas’ at Christmas

    Well, the Mayan’s deadline of Dec. 21 has come and gone, and we’re still here. Perhaps surviving yet another false prediction of the end of the world caused you to celebrate Christmas a little more enthusiastically this year. Indeed, for most of us there was a great deal to celebrate.

  • A rhyme for the season 2012

    With apologies to Clement Moore, we adapt our rhyme for the season and wish you a very Merry Christmas.


    ‘Twas the night before Christmas,

    And up and down the street,

    Joy and happiness ruled,

    Not a frown did anyone greet.


    The residents were nestled

    All snug in their beds,

    Only post-holiday bills

    Put dread in their heads.


    And me with my laptop

    And the Mrs. with her iPad

    Were checking the late news,

  • Life’s dark moments enlighten perspective

  • SOUDER: The end of the world, a fiscal cliff and some $80 billion deck chairs

    If the Mayans were correct, this will be my last column. As I’m sure you’ve heard, some say that the ancient Mayans predicted that the world would end on December 21, 2012.

    With the benefit of hindsight, some pundits have noted that it’s now obvious that the world can’t go on without Twinkies.

  • Negotiating a Christmas list

    There was a quiet negotiation going on in the back seat. I caught the words slowly but the meaning very quickly.

     “So,” said the 5-year-old to her 11-year-old brother, “why don’t you ask for a basketball goal, and I’ll ask for crafts?”

    Me to the 5-year-old: “You mean you want your brother to ask Santa for a basketball goal so you can have something else on your list?”

    Her: “Yes, crafts.”

    Me: “Crafts like material to create stuff, like at school?”

  • The season arrives when the lights come on

    The other night, as I was tucking my 5-year-old into bed, I felt a cool draft of air and, being a dutifully protective father, started feeling around to see if her window had been left open or a seal was letting in a breeze. But then the draft hit me (literally) on the head, and I realized what I was feeling was the air conditioner kicking on. In December.

    We interrupt this holiday season for – what – golf season?