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Columns

  • The awful fall of Kevin Ware

    INDIANAPOLIS – Kevin Ware lay on the raised hardwood of a basketball court constructed in a football stadium and feeling far more pain, we would bet, than any padded professional ever had endured on a fall Sunday in that building.

    He was prone, his lower right leg dangling and useless, the shocked victim of a turn-your-head moment so awful that his teammates and coaches and even nearby journalists were left with tears, choked back words and even throats full of bile by what they had seen of this fallen basketball player for the University of Louisville.

  • Life’s lessons in basketball loyalty

    Among the many lessons of loyalty parents are required to sear into the souls of their children, right up there with God, country, family, the flag and, oh, apple pie, is what would appear to be the loftiest love of all: loyalty to your team. These are lessons that include recognizing primary colors, memorizing pithy songs, grasping base humor and understanding unfettered usages for gerunds and participles.

  • SOUDER: Oldest degree of ‘madness’ marches on

    Well, sports fans, this is it: March Madness is officially upon us. And, with apologies to Andy Williams, for fans of college basketball, this is truly the “most wonderful time of the year.” Especially for those of us cheering for one of the local red teams (Louisville, Indiana and even Western Kentucky), excitement, hope and anticipation are in the air.

  • This isn’t just the 1st day of spring

    Today to you is the first day of spring, arriving on the calendar if not exactly aligned with the forecast this week of lows perhaps near the teens. Just when the daffodils start to feel welcome, they get smacked with snow, ice and more petal-numbing temperatures. Maybe this is the confernal equinox.

    But I’m not here to talk about the weather, no matter how easily that topic has been known to consume dead air, recourse dragging dinner conversations and fill the blank pages of uninspired typists. But those aren’t me.

  • Pieces of downtown Shelbyville are gobbled up

    At about 5:45 last Wednesday morning, I saw a photograph of the flames.

    They were bright and beautiful in their red, orange and gold deadliness, these flames. They were growing and scary and mesmerizing.

    Joseph Vance, guitarist extraordinaire and downtown resident, awakened by the fearsome smell of smoke, went into the cold March morning and saw downtown Shelbyville on fire.

  • SOUDER: When a cut isn’t a cut, or Chicken Little strikes again

    Perhaps you’ve heard the old joke about the woman who received a call from her bank informing her that she had overdrawn her account. “That’s impossible,” responded the obviously offended woman. “I can’t be overdrawn – I still have checks!”

  • Are we headed to the poor house?

    As a child I sometimes heard adults talk about a place called the “poor house.”

    I didn’t know what it was or where it was, although I envisioned it somewhere near Waddy, which seemed like a place across the universe to a kid who grew up near Simpsonville.

    The poor house was amorphous, but it was also scary. It sounded dark and forbidding and where kids wouldn’t be welcome.

  • SOUDER: ‘Don’t worry, be happy’ and other impossibilities

    The great theologian G.K. Chesterton said, “Christianity has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and not tried.” And, for what it’s worth, I believe he was right.

    Christianity is indeed difficult. Actually, I’ve found that humanly speaking it goes well beyond difficult. In point of fact, it is impossible.

  • Black History Month celebration doesn't feel adequate

    So let me get this straight: In 1976 the federal government decided that we would devote February to the celebration and development of African-American history, calling it Black History Month and expanding it from a whole week. Are we to take from that, after having spent so many centuries denying African-Americans as being whole parts of society, that 28 days each year seems a fair mortgage payment against that debt?

  • Bridging the best of our state

    If you know me and grasp that I have spent a large portion of my life in the shadows of Disney World, you might be surprised to learn that there are places in Kentucky that I have visited innumerable times and yet always have returned with a gift of something ineffable.

    To have survived the daily assault of tee-shirts and billboards perhaps left me inured to overwhelming promotion and more embracing of our state’s precious jewels, even if they are sadly too often unpolished to the sheen you see of their peers elsewhere.