.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Extension office open house draws big crowd

    The Shelby County Cooperative Extension Office opened its doors Tuesday afternoon for guests to participate in an array of hands-on activities during its annual open house event.

    Activities included butter churning, sewing and Halloween crafts, and attendees had the opportunity to pet various animals like snakes, chickens and rabbits. Guests were also treated to quesadillas, smoothies, and pumpkin muffins.

  • Cooking up an American dream

    With a trailer behind his Ford truck, Moises Tejeda is chasing the American dream.

    For 18 years, he’s been working in construction, moving houses, but he’s ready for a change.

    “I’m getting old, I gotta start doing something else. [Construction] is hard on the body,” he said with a smile.

    So, Tejeda decided to lean over a hot grill, opening Taqueria la Nayarita, a Mexican food trailer, this summer. But it was the year before that his cooking flame was sparked.

  • Searching for Sasquatch

    Bigfoot, Yeti, Sasquatch – society may not be able to agree on a name for the elusive creature, but there is certainly some intrigue to the possible existence of the hairy, human-like creature.

    More than sixty interested visitors showed up to hear information on the mysterious creature Saturday morning when members of the Kentucky Bigfoot Research Organization visited Red Orchard Park to provide a lecture and hike.

    Charlie Raymond, Founder and Lead Investigator of The Kentucky Bigfoot Research Organization (KBRO), hosted the lecture.

  • District to broaden career strands

    After a long, and sometimes heated debate, the Shelby County Board of Education Thursday approved 3-2 the funding of a new arts center for the district, although with some strings still attached.

    The board approved a recommendation to join the Ohio Valley Educational Cooperative in the building of a city center, which will provide art courses to students before and after school, as well as private lessons, at a maximum of $3.5 million.

  • Leak causes some discoloration for North Shelby Water customers

    Discolored tap water that showed up at homes on Benson Pike last week is no cause for concern, say water officials.
    David Hedges, manager of North Shelby Water, said that water that has the appearance of being tea-colored is the result of flushing the lines, which the company had to do when repairing a small leak.

    “It’s just iron deposits and sediment,” he said. “When you have leaks, it stirs up stuff in the system.”

  • Shelby named Farm Bureau agency of the year

    Officials at Shelby County Farm Bureau are still on top of the insurance cloud after being named Agency of the Year.

    They beat out 179 other Farm Bureau agencies across the state to garner the company’s top award.

    “We were very honored to be chosen "Agency of the Year" on September 17th at our Agents Association Annual Meeting at the Campbell House in Lexington,” said Pat Hargadon, agency manager for Shelby County Farm Bureau.

  • Leading the way into engineering course

     

    Students at West Middle School are already getting a taste of engineering experience, thanks to a robotics course being provided to sixth and seventh graders at the school.

    In the library at West Middle School Thursday evening, the Shelby County Public School’s Board of Education heard presentations from Carson Jorgenson and Abigail VanDeVelde.  The sixth-graders at the school presented two projects they had created in the robotics course this year, a program funded by a Project Lead The Way grant.

  • Chugging into expansion

    Edwards Moving and Rigging has long been known for transporting extremely large items all over the country, and now they’re adding another dimension at their location on Everett Hall Road in Shelbyville.

    Gathered in front of a newly established railroad spur, Edward’s representatives, local officials and other industry leaders held up a blue ribbon while company owner Mark Edwards ceremoniously snipped it to open the company’s new set of tracks.

  • Massie speaks at Cornerstone

    Ninth-grader Dallas Garriott got a front row seat when a congressman visited his school Thursday to speak to students.

    That’s because Garriott was the one who had asked 4th Congressional District Rep. Thomas Massie (R-Vanceburg), to come to Cornerstone Christian Academy.

    “I would like to thank Dallas for inviting me here, because I wouldn’t be here if not for him. So let’s all give him a hand,” Massie told the crowd of eight to twelfth grade students and teachers, after being introduced by Garriott himself.  

  • Carjacking, kidnapping ends in arrests

    After being forced to drive around all night at gunpoint – and at one point locked in the trunk – two people were finally released unharmed by their captors.

    That incident, which happened Sept. 5, culminated with the arrests Thursday of three people on charges of kidnapping and armed robbery.

    Corey Palmer, 18, of Shelbyville, is charged with kidnapping and first-degree robbery, both serious felony offenses.

    Two male juveniles were also arrested, but their names have not been released.