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Today's News

  • Looking backward: Feb. 3, 2017

    Information was gathered from previous years of The Shelby Sentinel, The Shelby News and The Sentinel-News. You can reach the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com.

     

    If anyone has an old photo that they would like to run with this column bring it and the information into The Sentinel-News office or e-mail it to the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com. We are also looking for mystery photos. If you have a picture you can't identify, send it in and we'll ask our readers for help.

     

     

  • A healthier community

    In keeping with a move in which Kentucky’s local boards of health are adopting a legislative platform targeting at updating the state’s public health system with the goal of improving overall health throughout the state, Shelby County is ready to meet that challenge, officials say.

    In fact, said David Cammack, new interim director of the Shelby County Health Department, appointed last year upon the retirement of Renee Blair, the board has already taken what he feels are great strides, considering a big change in staffing.

  • Plans afoot for pedestrian, bike pathways

    The crowd that met at the Stratton Center Tuesday night to give input on a proposed plan for bike and pedestrian pathways for the county was small, but eager to contribute.

    “We are from Brassfield subdivision, and we’re interested in getting a clear path to the park,” said Carmen Beste, who studied maps of the area along with her husband Richard.

  • Right to work law in force

    There hasn’t been much time yet for workers or employers to determine the effects of Kentucky’s new right to work law, which Gov. Matt Bevin signed Jan. 8, officials say, but union leaders and lawmakers share opposing views of the future repercussions.

  • Deep-shooting Male holds off Collins

    A pair of cold streaks on both ends of the floor during the first and third quarters squandered an otherwise solid performance in Collins 65-59 loss at Male Tuesday.

    Halfway through the first quarter, the Bulldogs (10-9) started to get hot, which left the Titans (17-7) struggling to adjust.

    “On the scouting report coming into this game, only one of their guys was shooting at a good percentage for the year,” Titans coach Chris Gaither said. “Some of their guys just hit some game-changing shots.”

  • Frankfort edges out Shelby on late turnover

    A costly turnover late ended Shelby County’s comeback bid Tuesday, as Frankfort handed Shelby County its 18th loss of the season, 81-76.

    SCHS (5-18) found itself down 75-72 with 49 seconds remaining in regulation with an opportunity to tie the game.
    But a forced turnover by the Panthers (7-17) took the wind out of the Rockets’ sails and sent Shelby home with another loss.

  • Collins, Shelby teams turn in strong weekend performances

    Both Collins and Shelby County boys’ swim teams earned a pair of top finishes to close out its regular season on Saturday.

    The Titans earned a second-place finish as a team in the standings with a final score of 277.5 while the Rockets slotted in behind them with 259.

    Both teams finished behind first-place Elizabethtown, which earned a whopping 517.5 points.

    Head coach Tom Coons was happy with the results he saw from his teams heading into regional competition later this month.

  • Hold the phone

     

    Shelby County’s Jillian Jacobs, along with four classmates at Capital Day School in Frankfort, are in the running for national recognition for a phone app designed to help feed the hungry.

    The team was recently selected as Best in State and Best in Region winners in the fifth annual Verizon Innovative Learning app challenge for a mobile app concept “Waste Free America.” For the honor, the team received a $5,000 award from the Verizon Foundation for their school and tablets for each team member.

  • Kindergarten start dates pushed

    Some parents gearing up to send their little one to kindergarten in the upcoming school year might have to hold off on their school supply shopping for another year.

    Starting this coming school year, children must be five years old on or before Aug. 1 to enter kindergarten.  Previously, the cutoff was October 1.

    In 2012, however, the General Assembly changed the law with the mindset that younger students may not be ready for kindergarten.

    That law is set to go into effect for the 2017-18 school year.

  • Night to Shine

    Although prom season as we traditionally know it is still a few months away, thousands of young men and women dressed in their formal best will make their way to one of 375 churches around the globe for their very own Night to Shine, an unforgettable prom night experience for people with special needs, ages 14 and older.

    Sponsored by the Tim Tebow Foundation, the worldwide movement will take place in all 50 states and 11 countries around the world at 6 p.m. on Feb. 17, and one of those locations includes Spencer Christian Church in Spencer County.