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Today's News

  • Shelby County School Board: Board expected to keep tax rate is flat

    For the second straight year it appears that the Shelby County Board of Education will not change its property tax rate.

    At Thursday night’s meeting, Neihof recommended keeping the rate the same, and board members agreed. Though there wasn’t much discussion, board member Karen Sams said she thought it was a good idea, as did board member Eddie Mathis.

  • County likely to keep tax rate flat

    The Shelby County Fiscal Court will wait until the last day to set it’s property tax rate for the 2014-15 fiscal year, but that rate is not likely to change.

    “That’s the recommendation that’s going to be coming from me and the finance committee,” said Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger after the meeting of the fiscal court Tuesday morning.

  • Men’s health fair Saturday at JHS

    The 14th annual Men’s Health Fair will be hosted by Jewish Hospital Shelbyville on Saturday and organizers of the event say it is an invaluable resource for men.

    “We’ll have twelve hundred dollars of free testing for men,” said Tony Carriss, chair of the Men’s Health Fair Committee, which organizes the event.

  • Shelbyville City Council: Trash, recycling ordinance to take next step

    After a long anticipated wait, the Shelbyville City Council will finally take the next, and most important, step in exploring the concept of citywide garbage and recycling collection.

    At Thursday’s regular meeting, 6:30 p.m. at city hall, 315 Washington Street in Shelbyville, the council will review the final RFPs.

    During a council meeting earlier this month, City Attorney Steve Gregory said that he expected to have the RFPs ready by last week. However, Gregory explained that there are some things within the RFP specs that still need to be wrapped up.

  • NEWS DIGEST: Aug. 20, 2014

    Kentucky students show

    improvement on ACT

     

    Kentucky public high school graduates still trail the national ACT test averages but are making gains over the past five years.

  • New school year starts off smoothly

    As the sun rose this morning, so did thousands of students across Shelby County, some eager to start back to school, some not so eager.

    With new “Frozen” or Ninja Turtle shell backpacks in tote, children unloaded from buses and cars, piling into the buildings by the dozens for their first day of the 2014-15 school year.

    At West Middle School, teachers greeted students on their first day with enthusiasm and high spirits.

  • Kentucky State Fair: Right on track

    Shelby County has a long and storied history at the Worlds Championship Horse Show during the Kentucky State Fair.

    Dozens of champion horses, riders and trainers have called Shelby County home, but our county’s reach doesn’t end at the ring. Instead, it reaches past the trainers, past the stalls into the hottest, hardest working portions of the horse show.

    And that’s where you will find John Hill of Shelbyville, for the 34th straight year, not wearing silks or riding attire, but ready to spring if a horse throws a shoe.

  • Serenading Lasorda

    Shelbyville native Ruby Lewis is about to wrap up her latest venture, co-starring in the national tour of the Queen musical We Will Rock You, which opened last fall and will close this month.

    Next on her horizon, she said – or least one of her next projects, as she is very active in securing roles in film, musical theater and other venues – is involvement in a theater group that she has been with in the past.

  • Fairness ordinance receives vote for no action

    Seats were full and tensions were high Thursday night as more than a dozen members from Kentuckians for the Commonwealth and the Fairness Campaign attended the Shelbyville City Council meeting with an agenda of expanding discrimination laws to include members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community.

    However, those supporters again left the council meeting feeling frustrated and left out.

  • Comer’s first stop, Shelbyville

     

    Just a little more than a week after announcing his plan to run for governor of Kentucky, Commissioner of Agriculture James Comer started his campaign trail in Shelby County.

    Monday morning, a small crowd of about 30 Shelby County citizens gathered outside of W.J. Andriots Paint, Flooring and Blinds on Main Street in Shelbyville to hear the Republican candidate speak about his vision for Kentucky’s future.