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Today's News

  • Rockets fall at Central Hardin

    The Rockets found ways over, around and through the Central Hardin defense in the first half, but changes after halftime brought Shelby County’s offense to screeching stop and ended in a 55-39 loss.

    At the end of the second quarter, the Rockets (5-19) were clinging to a 3-point, 23-20, lead behind the playmaking ability of point guard Kyion Stone.

  • A fighting chance

    Shelby resident and longtime boxing coach Abdul Jarvis doesn’t just teach his students how to jab and uppercut, but also how to counter attack their toughest opponent –Parkinson’s disease.

    A long-term degenerative disorder of the central nervous system, Parkinson’s mainly affects the motor system and causes shaking, rigidity, slowness of movement and difficulty walking.

    But through Jarvis’ boxing program, Rock Steady, his students are regaining mobility they once believed was lost forever.

  • Prison mission aims at reducing criminal relapse

    This year, the growing non-profit organization, Mission Behind Bars and Beyond (MB3), has kicked up its efforts to address Kentucky’s recidivism rates.

    Joey Pusateri, pastor of Simpsonville Christian Church, and a member of the board of directors for MB3 said criminal relapse is a serious issue they continuously battle.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD - Board to hold work session with budget committee

    The Shelby County Board of Education will meet Thursday for its regularly scheduled meeting at 7 p.m. at Clear Creek Elementary School, 279 Chapel Hill Road and will discuss spending for the upcoming budgeting period. During the meeting, the board will hold a work session with the budget committee and Public Relations Coordinator Ryan Allan said the committee will share its recommendation for next year’s budget with the board.

    Those recommendations, based on the board’s decision, will be reflected in the tentative budget presented to the board in May.

  • SHELBYVILLE CITY COUNCIL: Non-partisan election pass first reading

    Though Shelbyville City Council members had a long discussion last month in considering whether to switch to a nonpartisan election, when it finally come down to a decision Thursday night there was no dissention on the matter, which was on the table for a first reading.

    Councilmember Donna Eaton, who had first suggested the idea last month, made the motion to approve, and Frank Page seconded the motion. No vote necessary, only a motion and a second to get a second reading.

  • Looking backward: Feb. 3, 2017

    Information was gathered from previous years of The Shelby Sentinel, The Shelby News and The Sentinel-News. You can reach the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com.

     

    If anyone has an old photo that they would like to run with this column bring it and the information into The Sentinel-News office or e-mail it to the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com. We are also looking for mystery photos. If you have a picture you can't identify, send it in and we'll ask our readers for help.

     

     

  • A healthier community

    In keeping with a move in which Kentucky’s local boards of health are adopting a legislative platform targeting at updating the state’s public health system with the goal of improving overall health throughout the state, Shelby County is ready to meet that challenge, officials say.

    In fact, said David Cammack, new interim director of the Shelby County Health Department, appointed last year upon the retirement of Renee Blair, the board has already taken what he feels are great strides, considering a big change in staffing.

  • Plans afoot for pedestrian, bike pathways

    The crowd that met at the Stratton Center Tuesday night to give input on a proposed plan for bike and pedestrian pathways for the county was small, but eager to contribute.

    “We are from Brassfield subdivision, and we’re interested in getting a clear path to the park,” said Carmen Beste, who studied maps of the area along with her husband Richard.

  • Right to work law in force

    There hasn’t been much time yet for workers or employers to determine the effects of Kentucky’s new right to work law, which Gov. Matt Bevin signed Jan. 8, officials say, but union leaders and lawmakers share opposing views of the future repercussions.

  • Deep-shooting Male holds off Collins

    A pair of cold streaks on both ends of the floor during the first and third quarters squandered an otherwise solid performance in Collins 65-59 loss at Male Tuesday.

    Halfway through the first quarter, the Bulldogs (10-9) started to get hot, which left the Titans (17-7) struggling to adjust.

    “On the scouting report coming into this game, only one of their guys was shooting at a good percentage for the year,” Titans coach Chris Gaither said. “Some of their guys just hit some game-changing shots.”