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Today's News

  • Retired teachers publish children’s book

    A children’s book published 16 years after it was written is still doing well two years later, said its author and illustrator, both retired teachers from East Middle School.

    Maria Gordon said that she wrote The Animals Marched with Noah as a gift for her pastor’s wife, who was expecting a child. When she came up with the idea for the book, her colleague, fellow teacher Kathy Samples-Fenton, began an extensive research project, gathering information on all kinds of unusual animals that could use to illustrate the book.

  • Shelby County minister gets Magee Award

    A Shelby County minister has been chosen to receive an award that will enable him to attend an event close to his heart.

    Joey Pusateri, pastor of Simpsonville Christian Church, was named a 2014 Magee Fellow. That entitles him and nine other winners to attend the Kentucky Council of Churches Assembly on Restorative Justice Oct. 24-25.

    Pusateri said he made an application for the award at the Lexington Theological Seminary, where he is a student, by composing an essay on his interest in prison ministry and the concept of restorative justice.

  • Kosair to build $8 million facility in Shelby

    By next summer, Shelby County will be home to a new pediatric Kosair Children’s Hospital facility.

    Josh Honaker, president of Kosair Children's Hospital of Norton Health Care, headed up a presentation at Claudia Sanders Dinner House Tuesday to announce that construction on an $8 million facility will begin in Governor’s Square this fall and that it should be operational by 2015.

    “Our plan is that by next spring or summer, we’ll have the pediatric facility open and functional,” he said.

  • Donnell withdraws from judge’s race

    Shelby County Commonwealth Attorney Laura Donnell has pulled out of the race for District Judge Division I, leaving only one candidate in the race for that seat.

    Donnell withdrew her candidacy on Friday, meaning J.R. RoBards is now running unopposed for the seat vacated by Linda Armstrong in March when she retired, citing health reasons.

    Donnell said that she pulled out because she believes she can do more good for the community as the commonwealth attorney.

  • Shelby horses dominate at World’s Championship

    There weren’t many classes in the World’s Championship Horse Show during the Kentucky State Fair this year that didn’t contain at least one entry from Shelby County.

    The fair, in its 112th year, is one of the world’s most famous, attracting spectators and competitors from all over the world.

    “The majority of them [Shelby Countians] did well,” said Scarlett Mattson, manager of the show. “Shelby County’s got a lot of good horses. Mary Gaylord [McClean], she won her classes.”

  • SHELBYVILLE CITY COUNCIL: Rut ‘N Strut one step closer to opening

    The Shelbyville City Council approved the first reading of an ordinance to annex into the city fifty acres of property on Gordon Lane that will soon be the home of Rut ‘N Strut Distillery, LLC during Thursday evening’s regularly scheduled council meeting.
    The Netherys have asked to have the property annexed so they could operate with less than a 100-acre lot and so they could sell their distilled spirits on site.

  • A common complaint

    Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday announced Monday morning that the department of education is seeking feedback in regards to the state’s Common Core standards.

    Holliday explained that the words “common core” have become a politically divisive term.  Education standards should not be a political issue, he said.

  • Firing a Bulleit

    With shovels in hand, Diageo and Kentucky officials stood before a crowd yesterday morning and took part in the ground-breaking ceremony for The Bulleit Distilling Company, and officially tabbed the bourbon and rye distiller’s home as Shelby County.

    “What an exciting day, not only for Shelby County but indeed for the entire commonwealth of Kentucky,” Governor Steve Beshear said. “These folks could have built this distillery anywhere, they chose here in Shelby County and you folks in Shelby County ought to feel proud about that.”

  • Former school board employee indicted for embezzlement

    A former Shelby County Public School payroll clerk has been indicted on embezzlement charges, with a minimum theft of $80,000; the actual amount has not yet been disclosed.

    “A Shelby County Grand Jury returned on indictment today,” said Shelby County Commonwealth Attorney Laura Donnell Wednesday.

    Benita W. Anglin, 54, of Frankfort, is charged with 24 counts in all, including 8 counts of theft by unlawful taking over $10,000 but under $1 million.

  • Simpsonville City Commission: Residents voice criticism of mall traffic

    A group of about 20 residents of neighborhood on the outskirts of Simpsonville turned out Wednesday to voice loud disapproval of the way traffic control was handled during the first two weeks after the opening of the Outlet Mall of the Bluegrass.

    The group has been dissatisfied with the results of recent road construction on Veechdale and Buck Creek roads, and several encountered huge backups trying to get back and forth from their homes during the first two weekends after the mall opened on July 31.