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Today's News

  • Top stories in 2014 include projects, new business, civil suits, embezzlement

    Last year was an eventful year in Shelby County, chock full of important projects that came to fruition, economic development and even embezzlement in an unexpected area.

    Both city and county governments finalized solid waste issues both entities had been working on since the previous year: the City of Shelbyville is set to put its new garbage franchise in place Monday and the Shelby County Recycling Center opened Dec. 8.

  • In loving remembrance

    Shelby lost many prominent residents this year, from a former sheriff to a beloved veterinarian to a Simpsonville city commissioner, and several others, people who bequeathed a legacy of courage and admiration to a community they loved.

  • Masters closes shop after 4 decades of business

     

    After a successful 40-year run, Charlie and Lafayette Masters will close the doors today on Masters Equipment Co., a family operated business the brothers have operated together since 1974.

    Charlie Masters explained that the business unexpectedly got its start all those years ago after his brother and father took a trip to Wisconsin.

  • District to budget after state funding cuts

    Shelby County Public Schools will need to tighten their belt soon, as the district is expected to lose more than $72,000 in state funding, according to the Kentucky Department of Education.

    This spring, districts across the state will be slapped with cuts to their Support Education Excellence in Kentucky (SEEK) payments.

    The funding, which is provided by the state on a per pupil basis, has been declining since the 2008 recession.

  • Shelby in line with rest of state in flu cases

    The flu is rampant in Shelby County, health officials say, but add that the situation locally mirrors that of the rest of the state.

    “My contacts at the state said that it’s probably safe to say that the flu and influenza-like illness are present in all counties across the state,” said Zach Raney, regional epidemiologist for the North Central Health Department in Louisville.

  • No Internet service stalls county clerk’s office

    The Shelby County Clerk’s office was unable to do business all day long Monday due to an interruption in Internet service, officials said.

    “We’ve turned away hundreds of people today,” said distraught Shelby County Clerk Sue Carole Perry on Monday. “I mean, it’s the end of the month, the end of the year. We can’t do it manually, because the information is all in the computer, and no, you just can’t do it manually. When the computers are not working, we can’t do anything.”

  • Recycling Christmas

    Disposing of all the wrapping paper, boxes, plastic containers and other disposable items after Christmas should be a snap this year, with the newly opened Shelby County Recycling Facility.

    Solid Waste Director Rick Solomon recently found out that the center would be able to accept and recycle wrapping paper, which is the bulk of the waste from Thursday’s Christmas celebration.

    “Wow, I’m glad I found that out,” he said.

  • Family rebuilding goat herd after fire

    Kathy Mejia’s eyes filled with tears as she held her week-old baby goat. It is the first baby born after her herd was devastated in a fire in May.

    “Here’s my little girl. Isn’t she precious?” she said, stroking Solomon’s Song, as the baby’s mother, Flower, nuzzled her 3-pound infant in a pen on Zaring Mill Road, where Mejia and her husband, Santiago, lost 55 of their 75 goats in a horrific barn fire caused when a bale of hay stored in the structure combusted.

  • Inheriting a selfless heart

    Humble, selfless, inspiring, modest, involved, caring – friends and family members can’t find enough adjectives to describe Jennifer Harrod, owner of Jamison’s Sales & Rental and an Operation Care board member.

    “There’s not enough words to describe how awesome she is,” her sister Theresa Tippett said. “She is probably the most kind-hearted individual I have ever been privileged to know.”

    For the past four years, Harrod has worked with volunteers to provide a monthly meal for those in need.

  • Donations go a long way

    The Shelby Metro United Way wrapped up 2014 and tied it off with a bow, as this year marked the organization’s 40th anniversary in giving back to the Shelby County community. 

    Senior Regional Community Giving Manager Roberta Steutermann said that this year has been very successful for the organization.

    With thanks to campaign partners throughout the community, Steutermann said the Metro United Way was able to raise $296,000 in 2013 and reinvest more than $354,000 back into the community.