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Today's News

  • District to broaden career strands

    After a long, and sometimes heated debate, the Shelby County Board of Education Thursday approved 3-2 the funding of a new arts center for the district, although with some strings still attached.

    The board approved a recommendation to join the Ohio Valley Educational Cooperative in the building of a city center, which will provide art courses to students before and after school, as well as private lessons, at a maximum of $3.5 million.

  • Leak causes some discoloration for North Shelby Water customers

    Discolored tap water that showed up at homes on Benson Pike last week is no cause for concern, say water officials.
    David Hedges, manager of North Shelby Water, said that water that has the appearance of being tea-colored is the result of flushing the lines, which the company had to do when repairing a small leak.

    “It’s just iron deposits and sediment,” he said. “When you have leaks, it stirs up stuff in the system.”

  • Shelby named Farm Bureau agency of the year

    Officials at Shelby County Farm Bureau are still on top of the insurance cloud after being named Agency of the Year.

    They beat out 179 other Farm Bureau agencies across the state to garner the company’s top award.

    “We were very honored to be chosen "Agency of the Year" on September 17th at our Agents Association Annual Meeting at the Campbell House in Lexington,” said Pat Hargadon, agency manager for Shelby County Farm Bureau.

  • Leading the way into engineering course

     

    Students at West Middle School are already getting a taste of engineering experience, thanks to a robotics course being provided to sixth and seventh graders at the school.

    In the library at West Middle School Thursday evening, the Shelby County Public School’s Board of Education heard presentations from Carson Jorgenson and Abigail VanDeVelde.  The sixth-graders at the school presented two projects they had created in the robotics course this year, a program funded by a Project Lead The Way grant.

  • Chugging into expansion

    Edwards Moving and Rigging has long been known for transporting extremely large items all over the country, and now they’re adding another dimension at their location on Everett Hall Road in Shelbyville.

    Gathered in front of a newly established railroad spur, Edward’s representatives, local officials and other industry leaders held up a blue ribbon while company owner Mark Edwards ceremoniously snipped it to open the company’s new set of tracks.

  • Massie speaks at Cornerstone

    Ninth-grader Dallas Garriott got a front row seat when a congressman visited his school Thursday to speak to students.

    That’s because Garriott was the one who had asked 4th Congressional District Rep. Thomas Massie (R-Vanceburg), to come to Cornerstone Christian Academy.

    “I would like to thank Dallas for inviting me here, because I wouldn’t be here if not for him. So let’s all give him a hand,” Massie told the crowd of eight to twelfth grade students and teachers, after being introduced by Garriott himself.  

  • Carjacking, kidnapping ends in arrests

    After being forced to drive around all night at gunpoint – and at one point locked in the trunk – two people were finally released unharmed by their captors.

    That incident, which happened Sept. 5, culminated with the arrests Thursday of three people on charges of kidnapping and armed robbery.

    Corey Palmer, 18, of Shelbyville, is charged with kidnapping and first-degree robbery, both serious felony offenses.

    Two male juveniles were also arrested, but their names have not been released.

  • Meeting your Good Neighbors

    Farming is the backbone of America and our daily survival depends on a farmer’s hard days labor.  But despite the vital role they play in our lives, and especially in a largely rural community like Shelby County, many don’t know what happens in the day-to-day work on a farm.

    This past weekend, however, the Shelby County Cooperative Extension hosted the 2nd Annual Shelby County Good Neighbors Farm Tour.  Allowing more than 350 people to take a peek at a dozen of the typically hidden farms scattered throughout Shelby County.

  • SHELBYVILLE CITY COUNCIL–Street paving bid awarded

    Several streets throughout the city will soon receive a fresh coat of asphalt as Shelbyville City Council made a decision regarding the paving bids Thursday evening during their regularly scheduled meeting.

    Among five bidders, the board unanimously voted to award the bid to the lowest bidder, MAC Construction out of New Albany, Ind.  At $137,092.50, MAC Construction’s bid was nearly $5,000 lower than the second lowest bid of $141,901 from the local company, Shelbyville Asphalt.

  • Fairness groups plan to continue

    Despite a vote last month by the Shelbyville City Council to take no further action regarding a Fairness Ordinance, members of the Fairness Campaign and the Shelby County branch of the Kentuckians for the Commonwealth aren’t giving up the fight, according to Leslie McBride of the Shelby County chapter of the KFTC.

    “We’re not going to give up,” she said.