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Today's News

  • A helping hand in disasters

    Although very recently graduated from college, Michael Ducharm has thrown himself in the midst of a whirlwind training session to prepare him for just about anything.

    “I’m still in training, and I’m really excited about the possibilities on what kind of work I’ll be getting into,” he said.

    The Pleasureville resident who moved to Kentucky from California at the age of 12 is two weeks into a training program for AmeriCorps.

  • A selfless rescue

    It was just another workday at the scrap yard for Shelly Jamison until the sound of crying kittens turned his ordinary Thursday on end.

    “I was sitting on a forklift and I thought I heard kittens wining,” Jamison said.  “I got off and looked and sure enough, that’s what it was.”

    Jamison said it took some patience, but he eventually coaxed two tiny kittens out of a pile of twisted scrap metal at Midwest Metals.

    Without hesitation, Jamison took them home to care for them, but his efforts at the scrap yard were not done.

  • Anglin pleads guilty to embezzlement

    With a jury trial scheduled for next week, a former Shelby County Public Schools payroll manager charged with embezzling more than a half million dollars has pleaded guilty to the theft.

    Benita Anglin, who was arrested August 2014 two days after she was indicted for embezzling hundreds of thousands from the school district, had announced in late June that she would be working on a plea arrangement with prosecutors.

    However, Shelby County Commonwealth Attorney Laura Witt said that did not happen; instead Anglin made an open guilty plea in circuit court Monday.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Juniors ACT scores on the rise

    On Thursday, the Shelby County Board of Education heard a report from Susan Dugle, the district’s chief academic officer, on the ACT results for the grade 11 students (incoming seniors) taken in 2015-16.

  • The bridge less traveled

    Five years ago, the Shelby County Fiscal Court opted to close the Bailey bridge, but one resident hopes to see traffic return to the bridge once again –foot traffic, at least.

    Walter Laughlin said the thought of such a historic bridge falling further into disrepair was disheartening. Laughlin saw the bridge as a tourism promotion opportunity.

    “It’s a natural tourist attraction,” he said, noting that until the early 1900s, the bridge was a covered walking bridge and he wants to see it returned to its former state.

  • Squire Boone statue under construction

    With the statue construction already underway, the group that has worked for several years to get a statue of Squire Boone placed at the east entrance to Shelbyville finally has the full plan in place.

    Although not all of the funding is in place for the project, enough money has been collected – $100,000 – to get the ball rolling, with the completion of design plans, organizers say.

  • The Big Picture coming in focus

    Shelby County Public Schools has taken its first steps toward building the first Big Picture Learning Academy in the state, but nothing will be built… yet.

    Earlier this month the district announced that Jefferson Community and Technical College would house the program in its first year.

  • SCPS to offer free lunches

    Shelby County Public Schools announced this week its participation in the Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) program, a provision from the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 that allows schools and local educational agencies (LEAs) with high poverty rates to provide free breakfast and lunch to all students.

    Cindy Murphy, school nutrition food service coordinator, said the provision is a big step toward battling adolescent hunger in the county. Shelby County will participate at the elementary and preschool levels this up coming school year.

  • Kentucky is ahead of CDC opioid recommendations

    New federal guidelines for treating pain are encouraging doctors to prescribe fewer narcotics, especially high-powered pain pills such as OxyContin and Vicodin.

    The Centers for Disease Control recently released an appeal to the medical community in what it termed an “urgent response” to an epidemic of overdose deaths in the United States.

  • JHS receives C rating

    Jewish Hospital Shelbyville recently earned a grade of C for patient safety through information comprised by Hospital Safety Score and while hospital officials say the information is useful, it’s not absolute.