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Today's News

  • Reluctantly letting go

    At 84 years of age, attorney Ted Igleheart has reluctantly decided to retire after 57-years of practicing law.

    Igleheart will close up shop at the end of the year, but he plans to finish any pending cases from his home.

    Practicing law has been a lifelong passion for Igleheart, but he says time is taking its toll.

  • Shelby County Fiscal Court: County grant would provide EMS equipment

    The county has applied for a $300,000 grant that would allow for the purchase of some new EMS equipment.

    The money would come from a federal grant called the Assistance to Firefighters Grant, administered by FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency).

    Grants may be applied for annually, but Shelby County did not receive a grant last year.

  • Institute challenges teachers to rethink

     

    This week, educators from six districts in the state attended a Thinking Strategies Institute hosted by Shelby County Public Schools.

    Approximately 70 teachers and administrators from Shelby, Franklin, Tremble, Henry, Spencer and Gallatin counties spent four days learning about thinking strategies, visiting lab classes in Shelby County that are currently implementing thinking strategy skills, and putting their knowledge into action.

  • Car, foot chase ends on Boone Station

    After a chasing a man on foot and by car, including a second chase in stolen car, Kentucky State Police and county and city police finally apprehended a suspect in the Kroger parking lot on Tuesday afternoon.

    Joe Chesser actually fought the man – identified as Jonathan Curtis – off after he tried to steal Chesser’s truck.

    “He dived into my truck, I fought him off, he ‘bout broke my thumb,” said Joe Chesser, holding up a red, rapidly swelling digit.

  • City settles suit over Trey Williams shooting

    A wrongful death lawsuit filed two years ago by the family of a teen that was shot and killed by police in 2011 has finally been settled out of court.

    Louisville Attorney Frank Mascagni, co-counsel for Gardner and Stephanie Williams, parents of the late Trey Williams, said the suit came to a conclusion on Monday.

  • Human Rights Commission tables fairness decision

    The Human Rights Commission gave members of the Shelby Chapter of the Kentuckians for the Commonwealth a sense of déjàvu when the commissioners voted to table any decision on a recommendation regarding a proposed ordinance that would protect the rights of the gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community.

  • New solid waste facility to open next week

    In late October county officials announced that the opening of the new Shelby County Recycling Facility would be delayed until the beginning of 2015, but they now say that not only will it open next week, but also that people can dispose of their trash for free until January.

    109 Board Chair Rusty Newton had said that the delay was due to a problem with the scales kiosk; an additional piece of equipment was needed to make it operational so that people could pay for trash disposal, and the equipment had to be ordered and installed.

  • Fire on Benson destroys home

    A family left homeless after a late night fire Friday is doing OK, although there were some scary moments during the blaze.

    “Nobody got burned, but about four minutes after we got out, the house was just caving in,” said John Jones. “We got out with just the clothes on our backs, and it was so cold that night.”

  • SHELBYVILLE CITY COUNCIL – Water company to request rate increases

    The council has a single topic on their brief agenda for Thursday’s meeting at 6:30 at City Hall, which is a first reading of an ordinance regarding the revised schedule of charges for the Shelbyville Sewer and Water Commission.

    Shelbyville Municipal Water and Sewer Manager Tom Doyle who will present the ordinance said it is concerning an adjustment of the water and sewer rates.

    “The water commission is proposing a 3.5 percent increase on water and a 3.75 increase in sewer,” he said.

  • Shelter opens doors for fundraiser

    On Saturday, local non-profit men’s homeless shelter Open Door of Hope will host a Christmas Open House. 

    “We came up with the idea because we’ve had fundraisers but no one has had the opportunity to come in and see where the guys live, what goes on, ” said Stephanie Walker, Open Door of Hope volunteer.

    By opening the shelter doors to the public, Walker said they hope to raise awareness.