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Today's News

  • Louisville police shooting stems from Shelby County incident

     

  • Cardinal Club influent project underway

    Simpsonville City Administrator David Eaton gave an update to the Simpsonville City Commission Thursday about the progress of an influent line in that area.

    The line, which would carry treated water from the sewer plant in Simpsonville to the University of Louisville Golf Club, is being paid for by the university, but the commission is in charge of administering the project, Eaton said.

    “The first payment has been submitted,” he said. “It’s a reimbursement program, we get paid first and then we pay the contractor.”

  • Start behind, stay behind

    The latest research of Kentucky students confirmed a truth most educators are already aware of and many young parents fear –only half of our children are prepared for kindergarten.

    The study, based on kindergarten entrance screenings, revealed that only 50 percent of Kentucky children entering kindergarten are ready to do so.  While the number is slightly higher in Shelby County –56 percent– it’s still leaves nearly 5 out of 10 Shelby County kids unprepared to start school.

  • Lucky dogs

    If you’re looking for a best friend, you may be in luck next weekend – that is, if you’re looking for the four-legged variety.

    The Shelby County Animal Shelter’s Adopt-a-thon scheduled for Feb. 20-21 will give people the chance to adopt a pet completely free of charge, officials say.

    Leon Federle, director of the Shelby County Animal Shelter, said the events are held once in a while to help ease overcrowding at the shelter.

  • County will not dip into road money

     

  • Tedious tobacco training necessary

    There may not be much new information for tobacco farmers to absorb this year, but what has changed is that they have to attend a workshop if they expect to sell their tobacco, officials say.
    And they’re going to have to keep taking the class every year.

    “The word that they're trying to get out, is even if they got trained last year, they have to go to an updated training,” said Bob Pearce, a tobacco production specialist at the University of Kentucky who teaches GAP (Good Agricultural Practices) training classes.

  • Bike shop hits the road

    After seven successful years, Shelbyville’s only bicycle shop, Main Street Bikes, is hitting the road, but the journey will not be far.

    Choosing to remain in Shelby County, Tom Waggener, the shop owner, said he is relocating to Simpsonville while concurrently opening a second location in Frankfort.

    Waggener said the change is long overdue. 

  • Back in cancer fight, Hundley wishes for treehouse

    After a new cancer diagnosis, Blake Hundley is back to fighting for his life.

    An aggressive reemergence of the cancer has the family taking it one day at a time, but another group is rallying together to make a wish come true for the 9-year-old.

    Originally Hundley made just one request to the Make-A-Wish foundation – he asked for a treehouse built by Pete Nelson, the star of Animal Planet’s Treehouse Masters.

    When his parents learned that his wish had been denied, family friends decided not to take no for an answer.

  • The line between privacy and protection

    When it comes to student searches, at what point do school personnel cross the line between the school’s rights to protect and the student’s rights to privacy?

    While it is true that authorized school employees have the right to search students without consent, one Shelby County High School father believes the district crossed the line between protection and invasion and is performing random searches without justification.

  • Shooting for simplicity

    People interested in obtaining a permit to carry a concealed deadly weapon can now take that first step in the comfort of his or her own home by submitting an application online.

    The administrative process is handled through the sheriff’s office and Shelby County Sheriff Mike Armstrong said that being able to submit an application online does not mean the course is altered in any way, only the process of dealing with paperwork.