.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Simmons pays restitution for embezzlement from parks

    A former Shelbyville/Shelby County Parks and Recreation employee, who was arrested in June 2015 after being indicted for theft from the Family Activity Center, has paid her restitution.

    After pleading guilty to a lesser charger on March 7, Heather Beth Simmons of Pleasureville, the former youth services director at for the park system, last week was ordered to pay back the sum of $8,926 to the parks system. Simmons paid the money back on June 15 out of the $10,000 cash bond she had put up when she was arrested.

  • County to endorse KACo mortgage assistance

     

  • Rousing Republicans

    The mood was festive and the tone optimistic at Claudia Sanders Dinner House Saturday night as Shelby County Republicans got together for the annual Lincoln Day Dinner fundraiser.

    In addition to local Republicans, such as Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger, who is running for the open seat being vacating by the retiring Rep. Brad Montell (R-Shelbyville), other Republicans spoke at the event, such as U.S. Rep. Thomas Massie and Kentucky State Treasurer Allison Ball.

  • KY 53 construction moved to 2019

     

  • SHELBYVILLE CITY COUNCIL: Transitional housing plan denied

    The Shelbyville City Council seemingly reversed course Thursday when it voted against requesting a recommendation from the Triple S Planning Commission on allowing a transitional housing in the city’s downtown historic businesses district.

    At its previous meeting on June 1, the council had agreed to seek a recommendation from the Triple S Planning Commission on allowing transitional housing as a conditional use in the downtown historic business district at 701 Washington Street, at the former location of Making Ends Meet.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD SCPS to bring back handwriting, cursive

    Though it’s no longer required by the state, Shelby County Public Schools rolled out its plan Thursday to integrate handwriting lessons into classroom curriculums for the coming year.

  • SHELBYVILLE CITY COUNCIL: Council elects to begin condemnation process on 7th Street property

    The Shelbyville City Council Thursday started the process to begin condemnation and acquiring property on 7th Street just north of Washington Street.

    The 7-acre property at 219 7th Street includes several warehouses and a loading dock and is located just north of the intersection with Washington Street. The location is currently home to SanJuan, LLC., a distribution center for imported Hispanic candies and snacks owned by Leonardo Castaneda and Alissa Barker.

  • Simpsonville passes broadband ordinance

    The Simpsonville City Commission passed the second reading Thursday night of an ordinance that will allow a franchise for broadband Internet services.

    The move comes after much study by the city commission, said Simpsonville Mayor Steve Eden.

    "We did a lot of research on this, we’ve spent a lot of time over the past three months," he said. "Linda Ain [attorney] had come out of Lexington, and she’s done a lot of work putting franchises together."

  • Shelby student thrives in state environment competition

    Joining four of her Gatton Academy peers, recent Shelby County High School graduate Emma Saarinen has made academic headlines once again with a second place finish in a statewide competition.

    Competing against more than forty teams from across the commonwealth, her team from the Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science earned second place honors last month in the Kentucky State Envirothon Competition.

  • Mosquitoes heating up with weather

    As the weather warms, bugs are starting to flood hot, humid air, and mosquito bites are popping up all over adults and children, but the worst is still yet to come.

    “As of right now, we have not had the first phone call,” said David Cammack, environmental director for the North Central Public Health Department.

    The health department takes complaints about mosquito infestations and relays that information to state health department officials who then go out and spray pesticides in that area, a program that encompasses all 120 Kentucky counties.