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Today's News

  • Woman charged with videoing her children in sex acts

    A Shelbyville woman and her boyfriend have been arrested on several felony offenses connected with child pornography involving her own young children.

    Melissa A. Torres, 35, of Mount Eden Road, and Rafael Mendoza-Anorve, 39, of Shelby Hall Drive, were arrested Wednesday. Both were charged with promoting a minor in a sexual performance. Mendoza-Anorve was also charged with possession/viewing matter portraying a sexual performance by a minor, and Torres was also charged with distribution of the material as well as the use of a minor in a sexual performance.

  • TRIPLE S PLANNING COMMISSION: Public gets chance for input on craft brewery, distillery talks

    Per the Shelbyville City Council’s request, the Triple S Planning Commission will hold a public hearing during its regular meeting Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. concerning the addition of breweries, brew pubs, micro breweries and micro distilleries to certain districts within the city.

    The planning commission will hold the hearing at the Stratton Center, 215 Washington Street, in order to make a sufficient recommendation back to the city council.

    Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty said a change could be a boon to the city.

  • Linking classes

    It was a day of new experiences for many at Collins High School Monday as Mike Clark addressed a room of young students as principal for the first time.

    “You are going to have some freedoms that you wouldn’t necessarily have enjoyed in the middle schools, but you are also going to have some [higher] expectations,” he said.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD – District to discuss drug testing details

    The Shelby County Board of Education will discuss the implementation of a recently approved drug testing pilot program for athletes when they convene Thursday at 7 p.m. at the district offices, 1155 Main Street, Shelbyville.

    The board voted unanimously to approve a one-year pilot of the program in May in an effort to ease peer pressure for student athletes.

  • SHELBYVILLE CITY COUNCIL – Proposed tax rate stays flat

    The Shelbyville City Council approved the first reading of an ordinance on Thursday that will maintain the city’s 27.5 percent tax rate, the same rate the city has employed since 2005. If adopted on second reading, this year would mark a decade of a flat rate.

    Mayor Tom Hardesty said he is glad he can once again offer the citizens an unchanged rate.

  • SIMPSONVILLE CITY COMMISSION: Growth leads to lower tax rate... again

    The Simpsonville City Commission passed a first reading Thursday night to set its property tax rate, and proposed that the rate be lowered, a move that drew praise from city officials.

    “It’s something you rarely see happen, government lowering the tax rate,” said Simpsonville City Manager David Eaton.

    The commission proposed a rate of 10 cents per one hundred dollars of valuation, down from the current rate of 10.6.

    The commission did the same in 2014, lowering the rate from 11 to 10.6.

  • Congregation restores historic site for new church building

    Back in February, Josh Settles knew he had a huge task ahead of him in renovating a new site in which to locate his church if he wanted to be relocated by Easter.

    The problem was that the new location was in former historic building that had had very little done to it in its long history.

    But when Settles’ small congregation at Kingdom House on Washington Street set out to get the downtown building at 320 Main Street shipshape, their determination astounded him, said Settles.

  • Bringing in the barrels

    It’s been just one year since Diageo –the No. 1 spirits producer in the world–revealed their plan to build a distillery and six warehouses in Shelby County and the barrels are already starting to roll in.

  • School 101

    It’s that time of year again; the time when we convince our children to give up long days at the pool for long rides in a carpool.

    Sadly, summer is just about gone. And though autumn has not yet arrived, alarm clocks will move back next week as parents across the country roll their alarm clocks back in anticipation of our drowsy little ones returning to school.

    A big new school; an unfamiliar teacher; new classes; it can all be very overwhelming for a child-so much so that many of us have repeated nightmares of those very situations well into adulthood.

  • Adult day program being revamped