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Today's News

  • SCHS game against Spencer moved

    The Shelby County boys' basketball team's game scheduled for Tuesday, Feb. 12, against Spencer County has been moved due to the weather.

    The Rockets will now face the Bears for the final district seeding game Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. at SCHS.

  • Lady Rockets' game rescheduled

    The Shelby County Lady Rockets' basketball game against Butler, Feb. 11, has been rescheduled due to the weather.

    The girls will now face the No. 4-ranked Butler Bearettes Monday, Feb. 18, at SCHS at 7:30 p.m.

  • Weather service confirms two tornadoes in Shelby

    The National Weather Service over the weekend confirmed two tornadoes briefly touched down in Shelby County during the Feb. 5-6 storm.

    One tornado touched down near Ky. 55 and Clear Creek Road and continued northeast for 6 miles. Another tornado briefly touched down about 2 miles southeast of Waddy near Kings Highway and traveled about a quarter of a mile.

    For more details, read Wednesday's Sentinel-News.

  • Black History Month: Recounting a lesson

    February is Black History Month, probably as good a time as any to let Skip know I'm sorry even if the offense committed against him occurred nearly 50 years ago.

    The memory is as vivid as the permanent stain put on our society by the way black people have been treated for decades.

    My rural Kentucky hometown was probably little different than most other small communities across the South in 1959.

  • Simon Kenton, Butler up next for Lady Rockets

    No one can ever accuse the Shelby County girls' basketball team of padding their schedule with too many easy wins.

    The Lady Rockets routinely play one of the toughest schedules in the state, and the Lady Rockets' end of the season stretch shows just that.

    The last four games -- which will see the girls play two ranked teams and two region favorites -- kicks off Saturday with Simon Kenton visits.

  • Keep farm programs

    Food is our nation's best buy, a better buy than health care and about one-half the cost of housing.

    According to the U. S. Department of Agriculture, by the middle of February, the average American has earned enough to pay their food bill for the year. It takes only 10.9 percent of your disposable income to get the best, most affordable, safest, abundant supply of food in the world. The United Kingdom gets close at 11.2 percent, France at 18 percent, all the way up to the Sudan at 60.5 percent. Imagine having to spend half of your paycheck for food.

  • Home of 35 years is gone

    Wiping her tears with a tissue, Lillie Carriss looked around what had been her and husband B.F.'s house for the past 35 years.

    The storm that moved through Shelby County late Tuesday night tore the roof from the top of their house and demolished their barn.

    The outside sky is now visible where the ceilings once were in both the bathroom and foyer that leads to the basement.

  • School menus - Feb. 11-15

    Monday -- PARENT/TEACHER CONFERENCE/ NO SCHOOL

    Tuesday -- Hamburger/cheeseburger or pretzel w/cheese, French fries, ketchup/mustard salad dressing/mayo, lettuce/tomato, pickle/onion, oranges, applesauce or fruit cocktail, milk

    B = Sausage pancake bites or breakfast bun

    Wednesday -- Chicken strip or pork chop, BBQ sauce/sweet & sour sauce/ honey mustard, green beans, carrots, roll w/margarine, oranges, applesauce or fruit cocktail, milk (Simpsonville has Domino's pizza)

  • CUB names Bowling president

    Citizens Union Bancorp, the parent company of Citizens Union Bank, announced last week that it is promoting David M. Bowling to bank president.

    The move means that Billie Wade, who had been the bank's CEO and president, will shed the latter title.

    "It's a little additional assistance, and it's a little overdue, frankly," Wade said. "I have found myself wearing many, many hats."

    As bank president, Bowling will take over day-to-day operations of the bank, Wade said. CUB is based in Shelbyville and has branches in Jefferson and Hardin counties.

  • Weathering the wind: Officials still assessing damage from Tuesday storm

    Early Wednesday morning, Walter Pinkerton, his wife and six kids were awakened by violent winds that shook their house and pealed off sections of the roof and ceiling. As rainwater rushed through exposed portions of the house, Pinkerton gathered his family on the first floor.

    The next morning as a rescue worker walked through Pinkerton's house and surveyed the damage, he remarked that the family was lucky to be alive.

    "It was not luck," Pinkerton responded. "It was God's protection."