.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Matthews to be inducted in Journalism Hall of Fame

     

    Described as “a patriarch of publishing in Shelby County and Kentucky,” William “Bill” Matthews will now forever be embedded as a leader in the journalism community following his induction in the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame later this month.

    The award honors those who have made significant contributions in Kentucky to the profession of journalism.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Board to consider new board goals

    The Shelby County Board of Education will convene for its first meeting of the month this week, this time at host school Wright Elementary, at 500 Rocket Lane. 

    The meeting, set for 7 p.m. Thursday, will open with a presentation from the school followed by the board’s consideration for approval the 2017-18 board goals.  Last month, Chief Academic Officer Susan Dugle laid the groundwork for the new goals through a presentation that demonstrated how each new goal would continue to align with the district’s Strategic Leadership Plan Components.

  • Collins student receives prestigious Purdue scholarship

    When it comes to college applications, Collins senior Chris Embry has hit the jackpot.

    “There’s no way to put into words, but it’s a feeling almost like winning the lottery,” Embry said of the overwhelming excitement he experienced when he opened an e-mail informing that he had been selected to receive the Beering Scholarship with Purdue University.

    As one of just eight recipients of the prestigious scholarship, Embry will have little concern for college debts or expenses for quite some time.

  • Shelby farmer earns top honors in corn growing

    Once again this year, a Shelby County farmer has paced the state in corn production.

    Kevin Smith of Shelby County was honored in March at the 2016 National Corn Yield Contest in St. Louis that recognizes farmers from across the country for exceptional efforts.

    Smith placed first in the state of Kentucky in the No-Till, Non-Irrigated Class with a yield of 253 bushels per acre.

  • Health department tax stays flat

    Taxpayers won’t be shelling out more in taxes to maintain Shelby County’s facility this year, as the county has elected to maintain the same tax rate.

    At its meeting Tuesday night, the Shelby County Fiscal Court accepted the Shelby County Board of Health’s tax rate for the 2017-18 fiscal year of 3.75 cents per $100 of assessed property. That rate has not changed since 2004, when it increased from 2.8 cents.

  • Bill moves special elections to regular election cycle

    A bill that merges special elections with primary or general elections has been passed, and local election officials say it has been a long time coming.

    “The county clerks have tried to get that bill passed for years, and we never could get it passed,” said Shelby County Clerk Sue Carole Perry of House Bill 319.

  • New owner reopens donut shop

    After a brief closure at Donut Express on Midland Trail, new owners Morice Smith and his girlfriend, Shannon Chavez, want the community to know the shop is back open and the donuts are already rolling out of the oven.

  • Charter schools pass, leave questions

    The lengthy debate regarding a charter school bill in Kentucky has been put to bed.  Gov. Matt Bevin signed the bill into law last week and no appeal came as the session wrapped.

    Many urge that charter schools give parents additional educational opportunities for their students to be better served, while others argue the new law will take money from underfunded traditional public schools.

    Shelby County Public Schools Superintendent James Neihof said it’s too early to say what the new law will mean for Shelby County, or even the state.

  • Shelby 3rd fastest growing county in Kentucky

    New estimates released last week by the Census Bureau show Shelby County one of the fastest growing counties in the state.

    The Kentucky Data Center at the University of Louisville’s annual report on population growth for all 120 counties places counties in four categories: largest numeric gain, largest percentage gain, largest numeric loss and largest population loss.

  • Lyles receives WHAS/ExCEL award

    Standing before a crowded gymnasium of students and peers cheering her on, Heritage Elementary third-grade teacher Julia Lyles was all smiles Wednesday morning as she grasped her golden apple award in one hand and gently patted her tiny baby bump with the other.

    While preparing for motherhood may be an exciting endeavor for the soon-to-be mom, 2016-17 will also be forever engraved in her life as the year she was honored as Shelby County’s Teacher of the Year.