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Today's News

  • State auditor says Anglin had “too much access”

    In April, Shelby County Public Schools uncovered suspected fraudulent activity that resulted in the theft of nearly $600,000.

    Former payroll manager Benita Anglin was indicted for the theft on Aug. 20 and awaits her first trial date on Nov. 3.

    Immediately following the discovery, Superintendent James Neihof alerted the proper authorities and an audit by the Kentucky State Auditors Office was initiated per request of the district.

  • Shelby County's Thomas wins girls' state golf championship

    Seven years ago Madison Thomas walked onto the state championship golf course as a little kid no one really looked at, but Wednesday she walked off the course with all eyes on her as the 2014 Kentucky State High School girls’ golf champion.

    “I had seven tries at this and I finally got it,” Thomas said. “I really wanted this. It’s something I have been after for so long. I am kind of in shock, but it’s a great feeling.”

  • School board ready to vote on new voting districts

     

    An hour-long meeting may have finally brought resolve to an issue that has been lingering for more than five years.

    Tuesday evening, a special called meeting was held in order to establish new school board voting district boundaries.

    Due to population shifts and because the district boundaries have not been reestablished since 1999, the amount of voters in each district are off balance by more than 10-percent, and have been so for many years.

  • 2014 Election: Poll workers still badly needed, officials say

    Based on a broad ballot with a hot national race, election officials in Shelby County are predicting a good turnout for the Nov. 4 General Election, and because of that they are appealing to the public to come out and work at the polls.

    “We need both parties – we have eighteen empty spots,” said Shelby County Clerk Sue Carole Perry.

    Shelby County has 34 precincts and each of those requires four poll workers, two Republicans and two Democrats.

  • Shelby County Fiscal Court: County hires new road supervisor

    An icon at the Shelby County Road Department, Carl Henry is retiring after more than a decade as supervisor. Henry made the decision public during the Shelby County Fiscal Court’s regular meeting Tuesday.

    Henry has put in more than 27 years working roads at the state and county levels. When he hangs up his hat in November, he will do so knowing that the Shelby County Road Department is in good hands, he said, when he steps down to turn the reigns over to Craig Myatt.

  • Trash facility construction on schedule

    Now that the county’s new solid waste facility is finally under roof and its identity is solidifying, so much so that it has now been officially christened.

    The Shelby County Recycling facility smells of fresh paint and newness throughout its 30,000 square feet. With workers scurrying around Tuesday, painting the administrative offices, break and conference rooms a pale yellow and truck bays off white, installing overhead roll-up doors and other tasks, Solid Waste Director Rick Solomon glanced around in approval.

  • Shelbyville City Council – Curbside waste pickup finally has prices

     

    The long awaited trash Request For Proposals (RFP) have arrived and are currently under review by the trash committee after Mayor Tom Hardesty said they were opened Monday afternoon.

    “We had four and they were opened by the city clerk and myself and we briefly looked over the RFPs and we are going to refer them to the trash and recycling committee for further evaluation to make a recommendation to the city council,” Hardesty said.

  • Three honored for humanitarian service

    Three highly respected Shelby countians were honored Monday night for their humanitarian work by induction into the Shelby County Human Rights Commission’s Hall of Fame.

    Jeff Johnson, executive director of Operation Care, was honored for his work with that organization, and Harold Tingle and Dorothy Marshall were both honored posthumously.

  • Disposal event leaves no one down in the dumps

    Despite the cool temperatures and blistering winds, a record number of cars showed up this year for the Hazardous Waste Disposal Event, hosted by the city of Shelbyville and Shelby County.

    For the third year in a row, the city and county organized the event, which offers residents the opportunity to dispose of environmentally dangerous and hazardous products like paint thinners, anti-freeze, fungicides, and kerosene.

  • Retired teacher writes children’s book

    A retired Shelby County teacher has written a children’s book about the significance of the phenomenon known as a red moon – there was one this morning – but focuses on its spiritual symbolism rather than its scientific significance.

    The red moon, or blood moon, as it’s sometimes called, is believed by some theologians to be a sign of the End Times, and Karen Standafer said she uses it in her book to illustrate how children can embrace Christianity, using her grandson, Brennen Standafer, as the main character in the book.