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Today's News

  • Tribute to history

    A new exhibit at the Shelby County Historical Society Museum will draw attention to Black History Month for February, and replace the longtime Community Tapestry event.

    “As February is Black History month, the Shelby County Historical Society continues to celebrate the history and heritage of local black history,” said Sanda Jones, president of the Shelby County Historical Society. “Although there will not be a Community Tapestry event this month, the historical society will showcase a black history theme in the history museum.”

  • Identity of human remains still a mystery

     

  • Shelby County School Board - Board approves Draft Budget

    The Shelby County Board of Education Thursday reviewed a draft budget that, according to the district’s Director of Finance Susan Barkley, would not balance without some changes.

    Decreases from SEEK [Support Education Excellence in Kentucky] funding and required CERS [County Employees Retirement System] payments contribute to an unbalance, tilting the budget into the red at just more than $300,000 of nearly $50.4 million in expenses compared to a little more than $50 million in expected revenue. 

  • Restaurant owner claims innocence

    With an investigation still in the wings and no details forthcoming as yet from law enforcement, the owner of a local Chinese restaurant says that not only is that situation wrecking his business, but it’s all unwarranted.

    “No people, no people,” said Fei Zhuo Tang, shaking his head forlornly as he glanced around his empty restaurant, Asian Buffet, located on Howard Drive off Taylorsville Road in Shelbyville.

  • Bringing warmth to a cold tragedy

    In the wake of last week’s tragic high school shooting, Rebecca Jew is hoping to blanket Marshall County in comfort.

    As Project Linus Chapter Coordinator for Shelby County, Jew is helping organizing a national collection aimed at providing each of Marshall County High School students with a new, hand stitched blanket.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD - Board voices condolences for Marshall County

    Shelby County’s board of education meeting Thursday opened with a moment of silence in honor of the Marshall County School district.

    Tragedy hit their county last week when a student opened fire on his classmates, killing two and injuring more than a dozen others.

    “I can’t imagine what they are going through,” board member Brenda Jackson said.

    Board members agreed they would like to express their condolences to the district.

  • Shelter back open after canine flu

    A month into new management, the animal shelter is settling into a new routine.

    “Things are going well,” said Tracie Lennon, CEO of the Shelby County Humane Society. “There were a few bumps when we first started. We’re working well with Janet, we’re just working through the transition and we’ve had no major problems.”

    Shelby County Deputy Judge-Executive Janet Cuthrell said that since the Shelby County Humane Society took over the county’s animal shelter at the first of the year, things have been running smoothly.

  • 1978: 909 Shelby students out with flu

    Information was gathered from previous years of The Shelby Sentinel, The Shelby News and The Sentinel-News. You can reach the writer at gjennings@sentinelnews.com.

    If anyone has an old photo that they would like to run with this column bring it and the information into The Sentinel-News office or e-mail it to the writer at gjennings@sentinelnews.com. We are also looking for mystery photos. If you have a picture you can’t identify, send it in and we’ll ask our readers for help.

     

  • Church News - Feb. 16

    All Saints Catholic

    Mass is at 8 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. on Sunday. All are welcome to attend. Located at 410 Main St., Taylorsville.

     

    Allen Chapel United Methodist

    Services are at 9:30 a.m. Sunday. Located on KY 55 in Finchville. The Rev. Robert Raglin is the pastor.

     

  • Titans rebound to top Mustangs

    Despite playing its worst half of basketball all season against North Oldham on Tuesday night, Collins boys’ basketball did enough in the final two quarters to beat the Mustangs.

    The host Titans (20-8) committed numerous first half turnovers against North, throwing errant passes out of bounds and shooting just 30 percent from the field in the opening two quarters of action while managing just 14 points in the first half.