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Today's News

  • I-64 shut down after fatal accident at Graefenburg exit

    Interstate 64 is shut down at Exit 48 in Graefenburg, due to a fatal accident.

    Franklin County Sheriff Pat Melton said that at 12:15 p.m. a tractor-trailer that was traveling westbound crossed the median and struck an SUV head-on, killing one person in the SUV. The driver of the tractor-trailer has been taken to the hospital with unknown injuries.

    Melton said the eastbound lane of I-64 is closed and a detour has been set up at Exit 48. He has no estimate yet of how long the roadway will be closed.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Trial sparks intrigue, excitement for a 2nd time

    About 80 years ago Shelby County, along with the nation and the world, stopped to watch the court proceedings on Main Street in Shelbyville.

    The Garr brothers were standing trial for the alleged murder of Brig. Gen. Henry Denhardt, and everyone waited to see the verdict of what appeared to be revenge for the alleged murder of the Garr’s sister, Verna.

    And back in the Shelby County Courthouse this weekend, visitors watched the trial unfold again.

  • MY WORD: The reward is a sense of community... belonging

    “Good Land, Good Living, Good People” is Shelby County’s motto. I know that motto is at least 60 years old, and, I believe, the late Briggs Lawson originated it.

    My apologies if I have the attribution wrong, and many thanks to the person(s) who will soon set me straight if I do.

    I do know the former marketing specialist, civic leader and haberdasher used the slogan in his ads and letters about this community he loved and held such great pride in.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Make this season wonderful for all

    In today’s issue we’ve tried to find ways to help you spruce up your holidays. From the table to the decorations to our community, we want to help you make this season your best.

    But for it to be the best, it will take more than a new dish for Thanksgiving, more than stylish new decorations for your mantle or your tree and certainly more than the hottest new toy under your Christmas tree.

    What will it take to make this year the best? How about we spread that cheer like never before?

  • MY WORD: National Hospice Month: Attention to a growing demand for care management

    Every day, 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 years old, and up to 85 percent of them are living with at least one serious illness.

    That translates to millions of adults living with chronic diseases that may shorten their life expectancy and dramatically impact their quality of life.

    Without a coordinated care plan, many patients are caught in the revolving door of emergency rooms and doctors’ offices, incurring millions of dollars in unnecessary health care costs, not to mention creating needless stress for both patients and their family caregivers.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Celebration is about more than just lights

    Thousands roamed the street in Shelbyville Saturday, waiting to bask in the glow.

    The city’s annual Celebration of Lights culminated with the pop of the holiday season’s red, green, orange and blue bulbs.

    Downtown Shelbyville is now awash in color and Simpsonville will soon join this weekend, marking Shelby County as one of the first communities in the state to dive head first into the holidays.

  • VAN STOCKUM: Col. Ben Pollard, U.S. Air Force (1932-2016), Shelbyville hero, Part 2: A scholar, pilot, survivor – concluded

    On Christmas, 1970, Ben entered a large cell with 45 cellmates. He thought he had “died and gone to heaven!” They didn’t sleep for many hours as they met their new cellmates and swapped stories.

    Hazards of religious services

  • Author said new book was prompted by near death experience

    When Roger Snell lay near death in the hospital this past spring, his brush with the Grim Reaper chilled and changed him.

    When he recovered and left the hospital, he vowed to write a book about his glimpse into the afterlife, he said.

  • Farmer loses livestock feed in mysterious silo collapse

    Ben Nutter shook his head as he gazed at the ruins of a large silo that mysteriously toppled over at his dairy farm Sunday night.

    “I never heard of one falling before,” he said, pointing to the 60-foot structure lying crumpled on the ground. “There’s six hundred tons of silage in it – that’s three-hundred acres of corn,” he said.

    Nutter’s wife, Shannon, said the collapse of the silo on their dairy/beef operation on Drane Lane near Eminence is a catastrophic event for them.

  • Shelby farm family honored

    Shane and Mary Courtney are the 2017 recipients of the Kentucky Agribusiness of the Year Award.