Today's News

  • Traffic light could flash this week

    Officials with the state transportation department and city of Simpsonville can’t seem to agree on when the new light on U.S. 60 at Todds Point Road will begin flashing for a week before it is finally put into action.

    Andrea Clifford, the spokesperson for the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet District 5, estimates the light will first be turned on either Thursday or Friday.

    But Mayor Steve Eden said he doesn’t think so.

  • Attracting the masters

    The scene at Interwood Forest Products off Brooks Industrial Drive was a bit out of the ordinary last weekend, as the state’s highest rated chess tournament took over the business on Brooks Industrial Road.

    Fourteen players from six states competed in the showroom on Saturday and Sunday morning.

    Completely silent if not for the hum of florescent lights and the occasional cough, the room encompassed six hand crafted chess tables, each manned with two players sitting silently across from one another. 

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD: Three lanes could extend to Rocket Lane

    If you often find yourself inconvenienced by traffic along U.S. 60 at Shelby County High School, you may be glad to hear that a solution is in the works.

    The Shelby County Board of Education will consider allowing the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet to purchase a small portion of their property and grant a temporary construction easement at Thursday’s regularly scheduled meeting at Shelby County High School, 1701 Frankfort Road, Shelbyville. The property is part of the state’s planned expansion for the road.

  • SHELBYVILLE CITY COUNCIL: Public works presents Stormwater report


  • Grant helps JHS curb violence

    With an objective of curbing bullying and dating violence in Shelby County, Jewish Hospital Shelbyville will use nearly $290,000 in grant funds to support the Green Dot and Safe Dates programs, which are aimed at reducing the number of students who are threatened, attacked or hurt.

    These programs will provide education to students in the community on bullying, as well as the knowledge to identify aggressive acts and skills to reduce the number of incidents.

  • A welcoming night

    A parking lot overflowing with cars, the sound of children’s laughter and smiling faces milling throughout the building told the story of the success of Northside Early Childhood Center’s open house before Principal Brenda Musick even spoke.

    “It’s going just great,” she said from her vantage point in the lobby, gesturing around at crowds in every room, library, cafeteria and hallways.

    “The parents are enjoying themselves and the children are having a lot of fun meeting their teachers and just exploring the building.”

  • Hooper Station to get commercial development

    Shelbyville is making room for nine new businesses on Hooper Station and Mount Eden roads. But some nearby residents are not so interested in the change.

    Several outspoken and frustrated residents expressed their disdain for the future development proposed to the Triple S Planning and Zoning Commission Tuesday that includes nine new lots and three new streets adjacent to the Twin Springs subdivision.

    Kevin Young, a principal for Land Design and Development, said he had been working with the property owner for nearly a decade on the appropriate use of the land.

  • TRIPLE S PLANNING COMMISSION – New apartments coming on Old Brunerstown Road

    The Triple S Planning Commission had a crowded house Tuesday at the Stratton Center for the commission’s monthly meeting, which included an agenda equally as packed.

    Topping off the three-hour meeting were two zone changes that earned mixed opinions from both the audience and commissioners.

  • Bill would limit sweeping of funds

    Two local legislators have plans to introduce a bill that would cap sweeping of funds from three state agencies.

    Rep. Brad Montell (R-Shelbyville) and Sen. Paul Hornback (R-Shelbyville) will pre-file a bill for the 2016 Regular Session that, if passed, would cap the transfer of funds from three state agencies that deal with inspections of residential and commercial property in Kentucky.

  • Triple S recommends brewery changes

    With a positive recommendation from the Triple S Planning Commission Tuesday, the Shelbyville City Council will likely vote in the coming weeks on proposed amendments to text in the city’s zoning regulations to open the city’s doors up to breweries, brewpubs, and craft breweries and distilleries.