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Today's News

  • Post 37 kicks off season

    American Legion Post 37 head coach Jim Wiley purposely put together a very tough schedule for his team this year.

    Wiley believed his team would be very strong this season with a crop of successful high school players and a strong group of returning college players.

    However, things can change quickly. Wiley was hesitant to comment on the team's roster, saying instead he has a very strong team on the disabled list.

    "We have a lot of questions already," Wiley said. "I've seen them all play and I haven't been very impressed. Plus, we have several kids hurt already."

  • Commission hoping for 'downtown' Simpsonville

    The Simpsonville City Commission Tuesday formally asked Triple S Planning and Zoning to conduct a study on how the city can create a downtown district.

    "We're asking zoning to do a small-area study to create a downtown district," Simpsonville Mayor Steve Eden said. "We know this is a 20-to-40-year project, but we want to lay the groundwork now."

  • Roberts heads to Woodford Farm Bureau

    After 10 years with the Shelby County Farm Bureau, Courtney Roberts has taken the position as agency manager with the Farm Bureau office in Woodford County.

    "It's a good move and I'm just real excited about it," Roberts said.

    Roberts went to work in Woodford County June 2 and will move there soon.

    "I have mixed emotions about his leaving," said Shelby County Farm Bureau Agency Manager Pat Hargadon. "But I'm super, super proud of him."

  • Insects could be bugging ash trees

    Here and there around the county, one can see large blue or purplish objects hanging in trees.

    What are they?

    All types of speculation has abounded, from people thinking they could be something to kill mesquites, to thinking they were beehives, posters to promote a special event, or even a type of kite.

    But it turns out that they are actually devices to trap the emerald ash borer, a small green insect that feeds on ash trees.

  • Making racing safer

    Saturday, Big Brown may make it to the pinnacle of thoroughbred racing and become the first Triple Crown winner in 30 years.

    For some concerned trainers, owners and farriers in the thoroughbred racing industry, tomorrow may also be another day closer to uncovering the cause and effects of horse-related injuries.

    Mitch Taylor, owner of Kentucky Horse Shoeing Academy in Mount Eden and a certified journeyman farrier in the American Farrier's Association, is researching why racehorses break down on and off the track.

  • Call sparks false lead; Ethington still missing

    Although no new information has surfaced about Maxine Ethington, who has been missing for nearly two weeks, police investigated a lead Wednesday that did not pan out, according to Shelbyville Police Chief Robert Schutte.

    "We received a call at 2:21 in the afternoon from a gentleman in the cemetery who thought he saw something in the creek," he said.

    The chief explained that the caller had been visiting Grove Hill Cemetery and saw what he thought could be a vehicle in the creek. But when police arrived and checked it out, it turned out to be an abandoned shopping cart.

  • Watch for collectors, Crusade broadcast

    Simpsonville Fire Chief Walter Jones likes to get a head start on collecting money for the Crusade for Children. On Tuesday night his troops were already manning the buckets at the intersection of U. S. 60 and Buck Creek Road.

    This weekend, including today, the county's seven fire departments will make the final push for collections. They hope to top last year's countywide total of just under $187,000. Local fire chiefs are asking drivers to be on the alert for collections at the county's major intersections.

  • Board sets conditions for horse arena

    The Triple S Board of Adjustment and Appeals set down nine conditions along with the Conditional Use Permit (CUP) it gave to Rocky Fork Feeders at the board's May 29 meeting.

    Rocky Fork Feeders' owner Mike McIntosh is building a 60,000-plus square foot building on his farm on Dover Road to accommodate events held by the Kentucky Cutting Horse Associaton. Those events had previously been held at the Shelby County Fairgrounds.

  • A cross to bear

    When Rod Purves retired from the Navy after 22 years of service, he decided to take up his cross - literally.

    The California man left Newport Beach, Calif. Sept. 14 of last year bound for Washington, D. C. where he will take part in a pro-life rally on Aug. 16. Purves is carrying to the rally crosses he has made along the way, crosses covered with thousands of supporters' signatures he has gathered on his route.

  • Woman indicted in death of baby

    A Lexington woman who was charged with the April 5 murder of her infant daughter has now been indicted by the Shelby County Grand Jury.

    Tonya Nicole Brown, 25, was arraigned in Shelby Circuit Court Monday, according to Amanda Snider with the Shelby County Commonwealth Attorney's office.

    Brown has been lodged in the Shelby County Detention Center since being transferred here from the Lexington jail after admitting to Lexington Police on April 10 that she had put her baby into a plastic bag and thrown the child into a dumpster in Shelbyville.