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Today's News

  • Community datebook

    Support groups

    July 7 -- Bridges Center at Rural Communities Hospice, (for adults grieving the death of a loved one) will meet 6-7:30 p.m. To pre-register for classes or for more information about support groups, call (502) 456-5451 or 1-888-345-8197.

    Public can attend

    July 3 -- Shelbyville City Council meets at 6:30 p.m. at City Hall, 315 Washington St.

    July 5 -- The Cooperative Extension Service is sponsoring a short walk at 8:30 a.m. Saturday at the Family Activity Center. Participants will receive a free pass to the Family Activity Center.

  • Minor League All-star teams start district play next week

    9-year-olds

    Troy Kuhl is in his first year coaching the All-stars at the park, but he couldn't be more excited about his 9-year-old team.

    "I think we have a really good chance this year," he said. "We're a very talented team, and we have a lot of really good players. The biggest challenge for us will be figuring out which nine players to put on the field because we have so many good players."

  • Spanish-speaking doctor opens practice

    Dr. Mario Rios has opened a new family practice at 140 Stonecrest Drive.

    The office is located behind O'Reilly Auto Parts off U.S. 60.

    Dr. Rios, who lives in Louisville with his wife, Ruth, is a native of Columbia and a graduate of the University of Buenos Aires in Argentina. He has been living in the United States for 40 years.

    He accepts patients 9-years-old and up. No appointment is necessary; patients are seen on a first-come, first-serve basis. He and his staff speaks fluent Spanish.

  • Encourage bike riding

    I read and liked your Sentinel-News Comment article on Wednesday June 11 which related to gasoline prices, transportation, and health.

    When I started working for Roll Forming Corporation in 1994, several of the office employees suggested that I buy a house in Louisville.

    "That's where everything is", I was repeatedly told. I indicated that I didn't want to make the drive from Louisville to Shelbyville and back every work day. I was glad that I settled in Shelbyville then, and I'm even more so now, especially with the current gasoline price situation.

  • Insurance report card - Body shops grade providers

    Not all insurance companies are created equal. That's a saying Jimmy Brown routinely tells his customers when they come to his Simpsonville auto body shop for collision repair.

    Brown, owner of Medley's Body and Paint shop, said some companies will do anything they can to help their customers. And others will cut any corner they can to save a buck.

  • Local youth participating in Governor's School for the Arts

    The Kentucky Center is bringing over two hundred eager young artists from every region of the Commonwealth to the heart of the Bluegrass, as The Kentucky Center Governor's School for the Arts (GSA) arrives at Lexington's Transylvania University, June 22 to July 12.

  • Life at half-staff

    After five years of war in Iraq, it has become strangely common - and even expected - to see flags flying at half-staff around the community.

    While most of us would like to block the war out of our minds, the flags hung at half-staff should serve as a strong reminder to us of the severity of war.

    In honor of the men and women from Kentucky that die in Iraq and Afghanistan, the governor's office sends out a notice to all state agencies to fly flags in front of state buildings in the position of mourning.

  • Robots attack - Students learn programming, engineering

    This past week a group of local students learned how to program a robot to pick up objects, respond to verbal commands, and obey everything that it is told to do.

    Despite some of their parents' desires, the robots were not allowed to be used to do the students' household chores.

    The two-day workshop, which was sponsored by district's Student Technology Leadership Program, was designed to challenge the students' critical thinking and analytical skills. During the program, students worked collaboratively to design, build, and program a robot to do a variety of tasks.

  • Thanks for check

    I am writing to thank the government for my economic stimulus check.

    I spend my money on groceries and my phone bill. My food was really getting low; the money sure came in handy.

    Everybody should be glad they are getting this money and, everybody, please spend it wisely because I don't think we'll be getting any more in the future.

    Tom Douglas,

    Shelbyville

  • Police start bike registration program

    Police have come up with a new idea to help people get their stolen bicycles back.

    Officer Istvan Kovacs with the Shelbyville Police Department is asking that when city residents buy a new bike, that they come to the police department to register it. That way, if the bike should be stolen, police would have a way to identify it if it is found.

    "We pick up two or three bikes a month, and we put them into storage and then they just pile up," Kovacs said.