.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • What is more important?

    The Wall Street Journal has on many occasions been critical of a Farm Bill that has any safety net for the farmer.

    Thursday, March 27, they had a front page story questioning the need for a safety net in the 2008 Farm Bill. Asking why when farmers are enjoying record prices, record earnings they need a safety net. Why the need for 10 billion over 10 years. Not 10 billion in one year.

  • Estate planning for married couples

    Editor's note: Read more columns by local investment advisers in today's "Your Money" special section.

    As of Jan. 1, 2006, the law permits each American to transfer $2 million to heirs, tax-free.

    This is not because the I.R.S. has eliminated federal estate taxes. On the contrary, the estate tax is alive and well. The reason we pay no dollars in tax on $2 million is because each citizen possesses a transfer tax credit of $780,000. This figure just happens to equal the federal tax on an estate of $2 million.

  • Rainwater brings up sewage in Shelbyville

    The city of Shelbyville received some of the heaviest rain it has seen in years last week, causing serious floods -- and sometimes worse.

    Clear Creek completely flooded Elmo Head Park, located at the bottom of the hill at 4th and Bradshaw.

    With the sewage line under water, a stinking blend of toilet paper, excrement, condoms and the like bubbled up from manhole covers and floated into the stream. As the water receded, some of the mix was left strewn across the park to soak up the sun, giving off an unbearable stench.

  • Stocks and bonds and mutuals, oh my!

    Editor's note: Information for this story came from various financial organizations and websites, including Barron's, Morningstar, CNN Money, and Kiplinger's. As always, consult with an investment adviser before making decisions.

    Read more stories on investing and money-saving strategies in the "Your Money" special section insert in today's Sentinel-News.

    With the stock market down for the last five months in a row, and retirement funds in 401(k)s and savings shrinking like cheap sausage in a skillet, many investors are bewildered about what to do with their money.

  • Martinrea plans more layoffs

    Because of a downturn in the automotive industry, one of the county's largest employers has laid off 35 employees since the beginning of the year and is planning to lay off 45 to 55 more next month.

    Holly Sum, human resources manager for Martinrea Heavy Stamping in Shelbyville, said the company has notified the United Auto Workers union, which represents the workers, about the upcoming cuts.

    Over the next few weeks a union committee will determine who is cut based on who has the least amount of seniority and which positions are most needed at the plant, she said.

  • Don't blame Bush

    Having just finished reading the Op-Ed column in the March 26, 2008 edition of The Sentinel News, I feel compelled to answer the letter, "Bush is to Blame."

    I must hand it to Ms. Packard, she can spew out more inaccuracies, hate expletives and pure left wing trash than any on-line blogger I have experienced.

  • Lady Rockets face loaded field at Owensboro tourney

    The Shelby County High School softball team will begin play in the very difficult Owensboro Catholic Sports Warehouse Classic today.

    The girls are guaranteed five games in the tournament, but making the championship will be difficult.

    "There's great competition throughout the whole tournament," SCHS head coach Kelly Cable said. "There's a lot of ranked teams, and our pool is just loaded."

  • Working as a team

    The Louisville Metro Police Mounted Unit (LMMPU) held a demonstration at the Equestrian Lakes covered arena on Saturday, then let spectators greet their horses.

    After trotting the horses around to warm up, the officers explained the ongoing training that the horses go through.

    Through training, the officers said it is important to desensitize the horses to unpredictable noises and human behavior. To do this, the officers use a trash bag full of cans, which they toss around wildly.

  • Rockets falter against Butler

    The SCHS baseball team had an up-and-down run at the Southern Invitational.

    The boys hammered host Southern 12-6 Saturday.

    "We played really well and came out and hit the ball," SCHS head coach Bart Roettger said. "I thought we came out strong and aggressive and ready to play."

    The Rockets tallied a season-high 12 hits in that win.

    However, Monday's final game in the invitational wasn't nearly as sweet. The Rockets fell 14-1 to Butler behind eight errors.

  • Good clean fun

    With an ingredient list that includes cinnamon, oatmeal, cranberries and chocolate, Doug Burkett's handmade soap recipes might be mistaken for a dessert.

    But while the soap smells appetizing, the taste will still likely discourage youngsters from saying words they shouldn't.

    Burkett, who was taught how to make soap from scratch by his aunt Bannie when he was six, has nearly 50 years of experience in making soap.

    Some of his earliest memories are of being in his aunt's house watching his family make soap.