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Today's News

  • Development around mall has stalled

    While the Outlet Shoppes of the Bluegrass has continued to grow at the corner of Buck Creek and Veechdale roads in Simpsonville, much of the development around the monster 364,000-square-foot retail center seems to have stalled.

    While rumors of McDonalds, hotels, shops, more restaurants and even another retail giant Ikea constantly swirl around Simpsonville’s interstate 64 interchange, nothing is progressing, at least not too quickly.

  • 400 new jobs could land in Shelby

    More than 400 jobs could be opening soon for Shelby County residents as one of the largest international automotive parts manufacturers in the world is contemplating opening a new facility in Simpsonville.

    And that Thursday decision was made a little more enticing when Kentucky Economic Development Finance Authority gave preliminary approval for $3 million in tax incentives tied to employment and an $18 million investment.

  • 4 arrested in bizarre crime spree

    A bizarre crime spree earlier this month involving a joy ride in a stolen car and breaking into a school and a church, has law enforcement and victims alike shaking their heads in bafflement.

    “It’s kinda nuts,” said Dennis Dove, executive minister at Shelby Christian Church, one of three facilities hit in a frenzy of burglary and vandalism by four Shelby County teens during the first week of June.

  • Adult day care services in jeopardy in Shelby

    Shelby County’s Adult Day Care Center will be soon be forced to cut its services in half due to a reduction in funding, officials say.

    The center, located at the Shelby County Senior Citizens Center on 207 Washington Street and operated by Mulitpurpose Community Action Agency, will remain open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. five days per week, but that could change as soon as next month, said Pat Sullivan, director of the adult day program.

  • Shelby County Fair Horse Show

    With perfect weather and nearly ninety entries on the final day, the recipe for the Shelby County Fair Horse Show was perfect for a packed crowed.

    The final day consisted of 18 classes, with some of those hosting as many as 13 entries.

  • Board will look at altering voting districts

    The Shelby County Board of Education will hear recommendations on redistricting for the board’s

    geographic boundaries at their regular meeting at 7 p.m. Thursday in the district's offices, 1155 Main Street in Shelbyville.

    The proposed changes are a result of rezoning done by the county to balance the population after the 2010 Census, according to Ryan Allan, the public relations coordinator for the district. In regards to population changes, the county clerks office made some changes to voting boundaries.

  • Bringing beauty back into the Blue Gables

    Residents may have vacated the old Blue Gables Motel Monday, but that does not mean the rooms are currently without inhabitants.  On a tour of the building Thursday afternoon, roaches, bedbugs and other forms of life scaled the walls and scooted across the floors of the apartments that some Shelbyville residents called home just days ago.

    This week, the Shelbyville Preservation Group purchased and obtained the hotel turned low-income housing with the hopes of restoring the dilapidated, yet historic property.

  • Supreme Court tells Dean no

    A year after the presentation of oral arguments in a suit Shelbyville Attorney Mark Dean brought against Commonwealth Bank & Trust for not noticing that his secretary was embezzling hundreds of thousands of dollars from him, the Kentucky Supreme Court issued a ruling yesterday in favor of the bank.

    All seven justices sat on the unanimous opinion, written by Deputy Chief Justice Mary Noble.

    Officials at Commonwealth Bank & Trust expressed satisfaction with the high court’s decision.

  • Jackleen Lane, 1 year later, still no answers

    Tuesday marked one year since the body of 15-year-old Jackleen Lane was spotted by a railroad engineer floating facedown in Clear Creek.

    The case was closed by police – her death ruled accidental – the family is trying to heal and state social services officials will still not talking about the tragedy, which has left many questions still unanswered.

  • All packed up and nowhere to go

    Mattresses, television sets, refrigerators, and household goods filled the sidewalks and parking spaces of the Blue Gables community Monday morning as residents where being forced to vacate after being notified 45 days ago that their property was being purchased by the City of Shelbyville.

    Shelbyville City Attorney Steve Gregory said the city contracted with previous owner, Mark Stivers, and The Shelbyville Preservation Group, which is purchasing the property from the city, and provisions were set to ensure the tenants were properly relocated.