.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • District to broaden career strands

    After a long, and sometimes heated debate, the Shelby County Board of Education Thursday approved 3-2 the funding of a new arts center for the district, although with some strings still attached.

    The board approved a recommendation to join the Ohio Valley Educational Cooperative in the building of a city center, which will provide art courses to students before and after school, as well as private lessons, at a maximum of $3.5 million.

  • Leak causes some discoloration for North Shelby Water customers

    Discolored tap water that showed up at homes on Benson Pike last week is no cause for concern, say water officials.
    David Hedges, manager of North Shelby Water, said that water that has the appearance of being tea-colored is the result of flushing the lines, which the company had to do when repairing a small leak.

    “It’s just iron deposits and sediment,” he said. “When you have leaks, it stirs up stuff in the system.”

  • Shelby named Farm Bureau agency of the year

    Officials at Shelby County Farm Bureau are still on top of the insurance cloud after being named Agency of the Year.

    They beat out 179 other Farm Bureau agencies across the state to garner the company’s top award.

    “We were very honored to be chosen "Agency of the Year" on September 17th at our Agents Association Annual Meeting at the Campbell House in Lexington,” said Pat Hargadon, agency manager for Shelby County Farm Bureau.

  • Leading the way into engineering course

     

    Students at West Middle School are already getting a taste of engineering experience, thanks to a robotics course being provided to sixth and seventh graders at the school.

    In the library at West Middle School Thursday evening, the Shelby County Public School’s Board of Education heard presentations from Carson Jorgenson and Abigail VanDeVelde.  The sixth-graders at the school presented two projects they had created in the robotics course this year, a program funded by a Project Lead The Way grant.

  • Massie speaks at Cornerstone

    Ninth-grader Dallas Garriott got a front row seat when a congressman visited his school Thursday to speak to students.

    That’s because Garriott was the one who had asked 4th Congressional District Rep. Thomas Massie (R-Vanceburg), to come to Cornerstone Christian Academy.

    “I would like to thank Dallas for inviting me here, because I wouldn’t be here if not for him. So let’s all give him a hand,” Massie told the crowd of eight to twelfth grade students and teachers, after being introduced by Garriott himself.  

  • Carjacking, kidnapping ends in arrests

    After being forced to drive around all night at gunpoint – and at one point locked in the trunk – two people were finally released unharmed by their captors.

    That incident, which happened Sept. 5, culminated with the arrests Thursday of three people on charges of kidnapping and armed robbery.

    Corey Palmer, 18, of Shelbyville, is charged with kidnapping and first-degree robbery, both serious felony offenses.

    Two male juveniles were also arrested, but their names have not been released.

  • Fairness groups plan to continue

    Despite a vote last month by the Shelbyville City Council to take no further action regarding a Fairness Ordinance, members of the Fairness Campaign and the Shelby County branch of the Kentuckians for the Commonwealth aren’t giving up the fight, according to Leslie McBride of the Shelby County chapter of the KFTC.

    “We’re not going to give up,” she said.

  • Louisville group helps spruce up men’s shelter

    A group of volunteers from Louisville, at the urging of a co-worker from Shelby, turned out Thursday to fix up one of Shelby County’s most visible charitable endeavors – the Open Door of Hope men’s shelter.

    With paintbrushes, scrapers and other tools in hand, volunteers set to work Thursday to give Shelby’s men’s shelter a brand new look.

  • Heroin bust leads to felony charges

    A police investigation of several months culminated in the arrest Aug. 22 of two people on felony drug charges and the confiscation of heroin packaged for sale, detectives say.

    Shelby County Sheriff's detective Jason Rice said that Joshua Stump, 33, and Jennifer Bocelli, 30, of 726 Southlawn Drive were both charged with first-degree trafficking in a controlled substance (heroin), first-degree possession of a controlled substance (heroin), possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of marijuana and not having a prescription drug in its original container.

  • Meeting opens dialogue for Martinsville

    Tuesday afternoon Martinsville community members gathered with city officials at the Shelby Congregational Methodist Church to discuss changes that need to be made in the small community after a shooting over Labor Day weekend left the community shaken.

    Changes to improve safety, morale, enhance the livelihood and brighten the opinion others have toward the Martinsville community were all discussed.